24 Side Effects Of Green Tea You Should Be Aware Of June 22, 2017

Going green is the key, they said. And that’s what we believed too.

And we started taking green tea. All well, until some guy in some laboratory, does some research and comes up with something not-so-appealing.

That green tea has side effects.

And we better believe that too. Because yes, green tea has side effects.

And you gotta know them. All of them.

Green Tea (And First Of All, Its Benefits) – A Brief

In a way, this could be the healthiest beverage on the planet. And all those claims about green tea that have been catching your eyes (and ears) all these years, well, they are true.

At least, most of them.

The tea has been found to improve brain function and prevent age-related memory issues. It also helps prevent cancer and is an active ingredient that goes into most weight loss diets.

Antioxidants, if you ask me. That is what this thing is made of. Literally.

Additional benefits include improved dental health and enhanced immunity. Might also help treat diabetes.

Actually, you get the point, don’t you? Numerous benefits.

But there is another point you might have missed. It happened to me too. The side effects. Things about the green tea you weren’t allowed to know.

How Can Green Tea Be Bad For You?

 How? I mean, how?

Firstly, it’s about caffeine. Green tea is, you know, tea. And like any tea, it contains caffeine. That’s something we must accept first. Excessive caffeine intake has been linked to nervousness, shakiness, and anxiety. And people who are intolerant to caffeine suffer further – they experience the symptoms even with little amounts of caffeine (or green tea, contextually speaking).

Also, green tea can hurt your body’s ability to absorb iron. Now, that’s a problem. A deficiency of iron can bestow upon you a whole set of serious problems. You don’t want that. Green tea also interacts with certain medications, and the repercussions are painfully unpleasant.

One study conducted sometime in the previous decade suggested that the link between green tea and cancer prevention was weak and contradictory (1). So is the case with dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Another study found a pretty weak link between green tea intake and reduced cholesterol levels.

Actually, you get the point, don’t you? Numerous contradictions.

Drinking green tea in excess can result in caffeine overload, which subsequently causes insomnia, upset stomach, tremors, restlessness, etcetera. Of course, this is more prominent in people who tend to consume it in excess all of a sudden (2). In other words, if you are sensitive to caffeine, you are more susceptible to the side effects. As per studies, up to 400 mg of caffeine in a day is safe for most adults. Which is roughly the amount in 4 cups of brewed coffee or 10 cans of Cola or energy drinks.

Or 10 to 12 cups of green tea (3).

Alright. Now to the real deal. The side effects of green tea, in detail. But before we proceed, there is one thing I want to make very clear – there are no cases of green tea causing issues when consumed in moderation. And, the quality matters too.

Hence, if someone has side effects with green tea, it is either because they consumed it in excess, or had a low-quality tea, or are caffeine sensitive. Most probably.

The Side Effects Of Green Tea

1. Stomach Problems

 Caffeine could be the most common culprit. Though it has a lower amount of caffeine than other types of tea, it still can cause problems. This is because caffeine increases the amount of acid involved in the digestive process. This can cause pain or nausea.

Also, though green tea has been touted to prevent cancer, especially gastric cancer, studies say that there is insufficient information in this regard (4).

As per a report published by the University of Rochester Medical Center, if you experience stomach pain after drinking green tea, visit your doctor right away (5).

2. Iron Deficiency And Anemia

 As per a Taiwanese study, consuming too much of green tea could lead to iron deficiency anemia (6). More importantly, taking green tea after an iron-rich meal can make the main compounds in the tea bind to the iron. If this happens, the green tea will lose its potential as an antioxidant (7).

EGCG is the main compound in green tea. This compound is known to inhibit an enzyme called myeloperoxidase, which might cause inflammation. But when the tea is consumed along with iron-rich foods, EGCG loses its ability to inhibit the inflammatory action of myeloperoxidase, thereby leading to inflammation (8). In other words, it’s not just what you eat, but also what you eat it with, which determines the benefits.

Green tea contains tannins that block the absorption of iron from food and food supplements. Certain sources say that adding lemon to green tea or drinking it in between meals can counter this issue. Further research adds that consuming tea can decrease the absorption of iron from plant-based sources (as much as by 64%). For mitigating the effect, one can drink tea at least one hour before or after meals; and also include more foods rich in vitamin C (as vitamin C aids in iron absorption).

Another Taiwanese study has also linked excessive tea consumption (green tea, in particular) to decreased iron absorption and resultant anemia (9). And according to a report by the PennState University, the polyphenol antioxidants in green tea can inhibit iron absorption (10). This happens when the polyphenols bind to the iron in the intestinal cells and prevent it from entering the bloodstream. This polyphenol-iron complex is eventually excreted from the body.

3. Headaches

3. Headaches Pinit

Image: Shutterstock

 Again, because of the caffeine, green tea might cause mild to severe headaches (11). And headaches can also be caused by iron deficiency, which, as we have seen already, could occur through an excessive intake of green tea.

Apart from headaches, green tea can also cause dizziness. And as per studies, the maximum tolerated dose of green tea in humans is 9.9 grams per day – which is roughly equivalent to 24 cups of the beverage in a day (12). One important point to note is that though the green tea extract is listed in over 100 over-the-counter herbal supplements and preparations, its use as a treatment for any ailment is not strictly regulated by the FDA. Also, the safety of the long-term use of green tea extracts is not clearly defined.

Green tea can make one feel jittery and shaky, which may not be the case with decaffeinated green tea products (13).

4. Might Cause Insomnia

 Another possible side effect of green tea is a problem with sleeping (14). This can be averted by limiting green tea consumption, as the fatal dose of the caffeine in green tea is estimated to be 10 – 14 grams in a day.

Taking green tea too late in the day can also cause this effect. One very obvious reason for this is the caffeine, which stimulates the nervous system and can interfere with one’s sleep. More importantly, pregnant and lactating women must limit their green tea intake as it may pass into breast milk and cause insomnia in nursing infants.

A report by the Southern Illinois University states that green tea can cause numerous other sleep disorders as well if taken in excess (15).

5. Irregular Heartbeat

It’s caffeine, again. Caffeine is known to stimulate the heart as well. It causes your heart rate to speed up, causing irregularly fast heartbeat – a condition called tachycardia. This condition can make you feel as if your heart is pounding in your chest. You are more aware of your heartbeat than usual. Also called palpitations, this condition could even result in chest pain or angina (any other intense localized pain). A change in your normal heart rate could pose a serious threat.

According to another report by the Health University of Utah, intaking of a green tea capsule must be reconsidered in case you are suffering from heart disease or an irregular heartbeat (16).

6. Vomiting

 As per one Indian study, green tea polyphenols can, in fact, cause oxidative stress. And excessive intake of caffeine, including that from green tea, can trigger nausea and vomiting (17).

Moderate amounts of caffeine are noted to be 300 to 400 mg per day. If the amount exceeds, it can result in certain side effects, including vomiting (18).

7. Diarrhea

 Diarrhea could occur if you are new to green tea. Loose stools could be one of the mild side effects (due to the caffeine content), which can eventually subside as you get used to the beverage.

Diarrhea can also happen with excessive intake of green tea. One way to stop this is to reduce the consumption. Another way is to ensure you don’t drink green tea on an empty stomach. Instead, you can have the tea along with a full meal. This is because having food in your stomach can potentially reduce the ill effects of caffeine, diarrhea included.

You can also try taking green tea later in the day, most preferably in the afternoon. This is less likely to cause the side effect as the digestive effects in the afternoon and beyond are not as pronounced as in the morning.

In the case of severe diarrhea, stop green tea intake and consult your doctor right away. Mild diarrhea might be common. But a severe case is not. Also, ask your health care provider to rule out the possibilities of irritable bowel disease or inflammatory bowel syndrome.

According to the US National Library of Medicine, green tea is one of the many herbs that contain caffeine (19). And this is the primary reason it can trigger diarrhea.

In addition to diarrhea, green tea can also cause stomach gas (20). Caffeine has also found to stimulate the muscles in the digestive tract. This can cause issues in people with a sensitive colon (21). Which is why, if you have any history of colon problems, you must take expert advice before consuming green tea.

8. Muscle Tremors And Contractions

 Excessive caffeine consumption has also been linked to muscle spasms and twitching. And individuals with an abnormal sinus rhythm must limit caffeine intake.

Caffeine has also been linked to restless leg syndrome. If you are an individual with mild to moderate severity of this condition, it’s better you check your green tea (or caffeine) intake. One common characteristic of restless leg syndrome is the symptoms occurring when the individual is inactive. This could happen in the night while going to bed, or an aggravated pain in the evening, or twitching of the legs in the nighttime. Caffeine could aggravate any of these symptoms, including muscle spasms (22).

240 ml of green tea contains about 25 mg of caffeine, and according to one report, this caffeine can also cause tremors (23).

9. Heartburn

9. Heartburn Pinit

Image: Shutterstock

 Green tea is acidic, and hence can irritate the esophageal lining, causing acid reflux or heartburn. The condition could get worse if an individual is already suffering from heartburn (or acid reflux). Though normal brewed green tea could not be so potent, the bottled green tea that you so often find in the markets could be the real threat. This is because most of the green teas that come in bottles are fortified with an acidic preservative like ascorbic acid. This preservative can loosen the lower esophageal sphincter, which otherwise keeps the stomach acid from rising up the esophagus.

Certain bottled green teas come with a citrus flavoring, making them all the more acidic.

And in case you prefer to go for green tea capsules, discuss with your doctor once. Because the green tea extract in the capsules might also trigger heartburn symptoms. Also, only buy high-quality tablets at a proper health food store.

According to a Japanese study, green tea consumption has been linked to GERD, or  gastroesophageal reflux disease (24). The caffeine in green tea was also found to increase stomach acid, which can lead to gastritis (25).

10. Dizziness

 It has been found that long-term caffeine dosages of above 1.5 grams per day can lead to certain non-specific symptoms, a couple of them including vertigo and dizziness (26).

11. Tinnitus (Ringing In The Ears)

 According to the American Tinnitus Association, beverages that contain caffeine are known to aggravate tinnitus. Green tea, being a source of caffeine, can lead to the condition.

 12. Convulsions

 According to one study, green tea extract was found to significantly accelerate the onset of convulsions in the mice that were tested upon. The tea had always increased the duration of the convulsions (27).

Also, green tea might keep folic acid from working the way it must. This can lead to a condition quite similar to folic acid deficiency (28). Excess folic acid has been linked to seizures. Though this might seem that green tea, in a way, might help combat seizures – there is no evidence that it actually does.

Further research also suggests that high doses of green tea can lead to convulsions (29).

13. Bleeding Disorders

 Caffeine in green tea can increase the risk of bleeding. Which is why you must stay away from it if you have any bleeding disorder (30).

According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, green tea, when mixed with aspirin, might prevent the blood from clotting. Using the two at a time can increase your risk of bleeding (31).

14. Diabetes

 Though there are studies that have highlighted the benefits of green tea for diabetes, there are studies that state otherwise too. A small number of studies using green tea, the extract, and catechins (the main ingredient in green tea) only showed disappointing results in treating Type 2 diabetes (32). The same results occurred when it came to protecting healthy individuals from the disease.

15. Glaucoma

 Black tea contains caffeine. And so does green tea. But when one uses the two together, the risk of caffeine side effects just multiplies. Drinking the tea drastically increases the pressure in the eye. This occurs within 30 minutes of drinking the tea and lasts as long as 90 minutes (33).

Further research completely discourages women with glaucoma from taking green tea or its extract (34).

16. High Blood Pressure

16. High Blood Pressure Pinit

Image: Shutterstock

 The flavonoids in green tea that are touted to be healthy (which they are) are absorbed by the body at a rapid rate. This, along with the caffeine content in the tea, might lead to a sudden (but temporary) rise in blood pressure levels. Numerous studies have found green tea to elevate blood pressure levels. Though the rise in the levels doesn’t raise any health concerns, one thing is clear – green tea may not be the safest or the most dependable way to regulate blood pressure levels.

As per another Chinese study, a higher dose of green tea contains more caffeine, which invariably causes increased blood pressure (35).

And an Australian study offers a different viewpoint. The study was conducted to test if green tea could reduce the blood pressure effects of caffeine. The findings suggested that the tea ingestion caused higher increases in blood pressure than caffeine alone (36).

According to another study, green tea might lessen the beneficial effects of nadolol, a medication used to treat high blood pressure. What we understand from the results is that patients on blood pressure medication, especially the ones taking nadolol, must avoid green tea consumption (37). Green tea was found to interfere with the absorption of the medication (and similar medications, potentially) in the intestine.

Caffeine can cause a short but dramatic increase in your blood pressure levels. Experts believe this happens because caffeine blocks a hormone that otherwise keeps your arteries widened. It is also believed that caffeine provokes your adrenaline glands to produce more adrenaline, thereby raising blood pressure levels (38).

It also has been found that individuals who consume caffeine regularly have a higher average blood pressure than those who drink none. This effect of caffeine is the strongest amongst overweight men or those over 70 years of age.

One good way to check if the caffeine in your green tea is elevating your blood pressure levels is to measure your blood pressure readings 30 to 120 minutes after you have taken the beverage. If your readings increase by 5 to 10 points, you are sensitive to caffeine. And this means, you need to cut back on green tea and other forms of caffeine. But wait, ensure you cut back on caffeine gradually over a period of a few days, just to avoid withdrawal symptoms such as a headache.

17. Liver Disease

 Nowadays, green tea extracts are vigorously marketed as weight loss supplements. Though there is little evidence supporting the efficacy of green tea in this aspect, certain serious side effects, including acute liver failure, are being reported (39). As per a New York study, green tea extract is one of the many herbal and dietary supplements associated with liver abrasion.

The catechins in green tea deliver huge benefits like lowered cholesterol and reduced risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease. But if taken in high doses, especially similar to the dosage in weight loss supplements, these catechins cause liver toxicity.

Green tea supplements contain huge amounts of polyphenols, the most well known of them being EGCG (also called epigallocatechin gallate). As per certain case reports, consumption of 700 to 2,000 mg of EGCG per day led to serious liver issues. Hence, if you are at a risk of developing any type of liver disease, limit your green tea intake. And ditch the supplements. Totally.

Another New York study has focused on a case of acute liver failure in an individual following the intake of a weight loss product containing green tea extract (40). In one such weight loss herbal product that was linked to acute liver injury, green tea extract was found to be one of the primary ingredients (41).

Though there are a few studies that speak about the protective effect green tea can have on the liver, it is but a fact that only large-scale randomized trails can give the properly validated conclusions (42). The United States National Library of Medicine speaks of certain other weight loss products containing green tea extracts, which were eventually linked to liver issues (43).

According to another Canadian study, there is an increasing body of literature supporting what could be serious side effects (liver toxicity, in particular) caused by green tea extract supplements (44).

18. Osteoporosis

 Caffeine has been found to inhibit calcium absorption. It can also increase the rate of calcium excretion in the body. This results in a leaching effect on calcium levels in the bones, although only temporarily. But with extended consumption, this could lead to bone diseases like osteoporosis.

As per one study by the University of Connecticut, consumption of green tea extract resulted in lower femur length. It also led to lower volume, mineral content, cortical volume and thickness of the bone (45). This suggests that consumption of large quantities of green tea can lead to a reduced rate of bone accumulation during the formative years of an individual.

An excessively high dosage of green tea can also become a source of prooxidants, negatively impacting the bone matrix (46).

19. Skin Allergies

 The commonest allergies associated with green tea consumption are eczema and hives. An individual can also experience a tingling sensation on the face, lips, tongue, or in the throat.

Although rare, one severe allergic reaction green tea can cause is an anaphylactic shock. This is when the throat swells, blood pressure levels suddenly drop, hives break out, the abdomen might start to ache, and the individual might experience dizziness and anxiety.

20. Kidney Issues

 A review of studies has proven that the very polyphenols that are credited with preventing cancer and heart disease can also cause kidney damage if taken in excessive quantities (47). As per experts, people consuming green tea supplements must exercise caution, in particular.

21. Issues With The Thyroid Gland

21. Issues With The Thyroid Gland Pinit

Image: Shutterstock

 Studies have suggested that the catechins in green tea might affect the functioning of the thyroid gland. As per one study published in 2013, catechins can disrupt thyroid function and block the production of hormones. This can also lead to the enlargement of the thyroid glands. Hence, if you already are on thyroid medication, take your doctor’s advice on green tea intake.

Tea consumption, in general, has also been linked to reduced production of T3 and T4 hormones. This leads to an increased production of TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone), which can cause thyroid issues.

One Indian study states that thyroid function could be impaired by high doses of green tea extracts (48). Another Japanese study had established a link between high green tea intake and premenopausal thyroid cancer risk (49). Though this wasn’t the case with postmenopausal cancer risk, caution is advised.

22. Frequent Urination

The caffeine in green tea also acts as a natural diuretic. As per reports, keeping green tea intake within 5 cups per day (or 200 to 300 mg of caffeine per day) can be one solution.

Green tea is also one of those beverages that can aggravate the bladder. This is especially true if the individual is suffering from a urinary tract infection. In such an eventuality, they must avoid green tea (or any form of caffeine) and drink plenty of water instead.

The caffeine in green tea can also cause bladder spasms leading to bladder control issues. Caffeine can even constrict the smooth muscles of the bladder, making urination difficult. One alternative could be intake of decaffeinated green tea. But hey, consult your doctor first. In fact, frequent urination is one of the symptoms of caffeine sensitivity one must watch out for (50).

In certain sensitive women, tea might even cause bladder irritation and make them leak urine (51). In fact, avoiding tea or coffee or any caffeinated beverage (including green tea) is one way to help treat urinary tract infection (52).

23. Fertility

 One study states that consuming green tea too often can lower fertility (53). In the study, embryos and larvae subjected to smaller doses of green tea were slower to develop. They also showed a decline in their ability to produce offspring.

In another study, the test group treated with green tea leaf extract showed a decrease in the serum testosterone levels (54).

Green tea was also found to impair development and reproduction in fruit flies. And similar results are potentially possible in humans as well (55).

24. Teeth

 One major downside of tea, or green tea in this context, with respect to teeth is it contains tannins. And two, it is its acidic nature. These two factors cause the tea to stain your teeth (56).

Another downside is what we have seen with calcium – caffeine in green tea can slow down the absorption of calcium, weakening teeth or limiting their growth.

That’s about the side effects. But green tea has certain other side effects that could be potentially harmful to pregnant women.

We have already seen some of them in brief.

But now we will look at the rest. In detail.

Side Effects Of Green Tea In Pregnant Women

 Since green tea contains caffeine, and since caffeine is a diuretic, it must be limited during pregnancy. The reason being caffeine might affect the amount of water in the body. Hydration, as we know, is crucial during pregnancy – and with diuretics like caffeine, there could be a problem. Losing too much of water could lead to an imbalance in the body’s electrolytes.

According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, a woman must not consume more than 200 mg of caffeine a day during pregnancy.

More importantly, caffeine is one of the many substances your baby cannot metabolize or use.

Studies have stated that pregnant women who intake green tea increase the risk of birth defects like spina bifida (57). Also, as we had seen before, green tea could result in a folic acid deficiency. And there is no need to discuss the importance of folic acid for pregnancy. It is but crucial.

Even though the caffeine content in green tea is 30 to 60 percent less than that in coffee, its consumption is discouraged as it can interfere with numerous metabolic processes during pregnancy (58).

According to another Brazilian study, consumption of green tea during pregnancy can result in fetal ductal constriction (pulmonary hypertension of the fetus) (59).

The University of Maryland Medical Center advises against the intake of green tea by pregnant and breastfeeding women (60).

Most studies recommend against the use of green tea during pregnancy. Although certain studies say limited consumption is okay, it is always best to consult your doctor (61). It could even be a herbal tea marketed specifically for the benefit of pregnant women – always consult your doctor first.

Excess consumption of caffeine (green tea) during pregnancy can also cause abortion.

But wait, we are not over yet.

Can People On Medication Drink Green Tea?

Green tea is known to interact with certain medications and cause undesirable effects. Following is the list of a few commonly used medications green tea must not be taken with, and the effects one might face if they do (62).

Ephedrine – Might cause agitation, insomnia, unhealthy weight loss, and tremors

 Clozapine – The anti-psychotic effects of this medicine might get diluted if taken  within 40 minutes of green tea intake

Lithium – Green tea might reduce the blood levels of this medication, which is used to treat depression

Monoamine oxidase inhibitors – Might result in a drastic increase in blood pressure

Phenylpropanolamine – This medication, when taken along with caffeine (which green tea has) can lead to mania and a steep increase in blood pressure

Antibiotics – Might increase the effectiveness of certain antibiotics (like beta-lactam) by reducing bacterial resistance to the treatment

 Green tea must also not be used when taking blood thinners (63) – this includes medications like warfarin. Green tea contains vitamin K, which might render warfarin ineffective.

 And green tea, when combined with chemotherapy drugs, was found to make the cancer cells less sensitive to the treatment (64).

 And now, for the next big question..

Can People On Medication Drink Green Tea Pinit

Image: Shutterstock

How Much Of Green Tea Is Considered Safe?

 An ideal dose of green tea is 3 to 5 cups per day, which could be equal to 1,200 ml (or 250 mg of catechins) (65). Never take green tea on an empty stomach as it might cause liver toxicity.

If you are suffering from anogenital warts, the dosage would be topical application of the tea thrice a day for a minimum of 6 weeks. If you are suffering from heart disease, the dosage would be 400 to 716 mg of catechins per day. For diabetics, the dosage of EGCG would be 84 to 386 mg per day. And for obese individuals, it is 125 to 625 mg of catechins per day.

But like always, check with your doctor – as (s)he would know your condition best.

How to drink green tea without the side effects?

Best Brands Of Green Tea With Low Caffeine

 Now we know caffeine is the culprit. At least, most of the time. But do we have green tea brands in the market with low caffeine? Yes.

What are they? Check them out.

Ryu Mei Organic Hojicha Green Tea

 Choice Organic Bancha Hojicha Roasted Green Tea

 You can also check Typhoo Green Tea  – it is one inexpensive option, just in case you are trying green tea for the first time and wish to savor its taste.

 A note on green tea supplements/tablets – for best results, you must drink plenty of water. And to maximize the benefits, you can pair the supplement with quercetin and fish oil – either in a meal, or in a supplement form. These two nutrients help enhance the bioavailability of green tea.

 Certain Green Tea Supplements/Brands/Types In The Market To Be Wary About

 The Green Tea Triple Fat Burner

There is one supplement many people have had questions about –  It is a diet supplement. And it comes with certain undesirable effects. The first is anxiety, given it contains a caffeine stimulant. Other ill effects include gastric disturbances and arrhythmia (change in your heart rhythm).

Green Tea CR

 This one is sold as an energy booster and also for weight loss. But no, this doesn’t work as expected.

Matcha Green Tea

 This powdered green has certain benefits (66). But like any other green tea brand, it can cause side effects if consumed in excess. So, take care.

SlimQuick Biopure Green Tea

 This is basically a weight loss tablet. Thought it claims to help one lose weight (particularly for women) quickly, it doesn’t last. And it has the side effects of caffeine too.

Decaffeinated Green Tea

 Yes, even we have spoken well about decaffeinated green tea. But it could be better than green tea that contains caffeine. Otherwise, it also comes with certain warnings.

There are two kinds of decaffeination. The first is manual, which drastically reduces the concentration of catechins in the tea. This robs off its health benefits.

The second is natural, where the tea leaves are soaked in water to release the caffeine and other compounds in the tea. Then the tea leaves are separated from the water, and the water is brought in contact with a solvent called ethyl acetate (to absorb the caffeine). The tea leaves are again immersed into this water to absorb the lost nutrients. The problem here is – leaves that are returned to the water again accumulate traces of ethyl acetate, and the chemical, in higher doses, can cause issues with the liver, nervous, and the respiratory systems.

Gunpowder Green Tea

 This is made in a slightly different way. The leaves are rolled into small, tight pellets. But the benefits and side effects are the same as whatever we had discussed in this post.

Green Tea With Hoodia

 Hoodia is a South African cactus breed, from which a compound that acts as an appetite suppressant is derived. It has been used along with green tea supplements and marketed as a weight loss product. But no, be wary of it. The rarity of hoodia has encouraged certain fake players to enter the market. And it does cause side effects.

Be sure of what you buy from the market. Your health matters, not only to you, but to us as well.

We know you have a few more questions. Which is why we have the …

Expert’s Answers for Readers Questions

Is it safe to drink green tea on an empty stomach?

No. Green tea contains tannins that might increase stomach acid and cause stomach ache, nausea, and even constipation.

What is EGCG in the green tea extract?

EGCG, or epigallocatechin gallate, is a major component in green tea. It is considered the most significant active component in green tea.

And by the way, in certain parts of the world green tea extract is also called green tea complex. So both mean the same. More or less.

Why does green tea make me feel sick?

It depends on the type of green tea you are consuming. Is the green tea you are consuming organic? If yes, you probably are sensitive to the caffeine in the tea.

Or maybe you are taking it on an empty stomach? Never do that. Try taking the tea as you eat something.

Does green tea cause cancer?

No, it doesn’t cause cancer. But there is no solid evidence that states it can prevent it, either.

But it does boost certain factors that can help combat cancer (67). So yes, green tea, indirectly, might help combat cancer.

Can green tea cause constipation?

It might. Because it contains caffeine and caffeine is a diuretic. If you don’t drink sufficient water, the fluid can be withdrawn from your stools. This causes hardened stools and constipation.

What is the Arizona green tea? Is it any better?

This is another type of green tea that comes with sugar. Something like tea-flavored sugar water. About this being any better, well, we have mixed results. Stick to what has been working for you. Or, consult your doctor.

What are the green tea cigarettes? What are the effects of smoking them?

It is basically a way that claims to help people quit smoking. Introduced by acupuncturist Ranko Tutulugdzija, they are nothing but green tea leaves rolled into cigarettes without the nicotine (68). The idea is to give the smoker the same sensation as smoking, all the while motivating him to quit the habit.

Can I add sugar to green tea?

Yes. Studies show that adding sugar, along with vitamin C, enhance the body’s ability to absorb the tea’s polyphenols. But if you are diabetic, consult your doctor.

Does taking too much of green tea cause my stool to turn green?

No. Unless otherwise you are taking bottled green tea that contains certain dyes.

When should I take green tea?

If you are taking green tea for its antioxidants, take it in between meals. But if you are deficient in iron, avoid it.

If it’s for weight loss, you can still take it with meals. But ensure you don’t have a sensitive stomach.

Also, never consume the tea on an empty stomach or very early in the morning. You can also take it before going to bed – but ensure there is at least an hour gap. Taking green tea right before going to bed might wake you up in the dead of the night to visit the washroom.

What is the best way to take green tea?

Simply follow these pointers –

Not more then 2 to 3 cups a day

Never have it on an empty stomach

Don’t sip it late in the night

Don’t reuse the green tea bags

Don’t take it immediately after meals either

Since it can act as a diuretic, also drink adequate water

This also is a way to drink green tea without having to suffer the side effects.

Conclusion

Go green. But not greener.

But before that, do let us know how this post has helped you. We are looking forward to hearing from you. It helps us serve you better, which is all we care about.

Really.

Recommended Articles:

  • http://www.stylecraze.com/members/chahna/ Chahna

    basically i hate tea i even i dont know about this green tea!! as you mentioned here green tea cons i never drink for next time yup!! thanks aparajita :)

  • http://www.stylecraze.com/members/gargisinha/ GARGI SINHA

    i never drink any tea or coffee..thank god

  • http://www.stylecraze.com/members/nimratachowan/ Nimrata

    Very informative one aparajitha:) Didnt know green tea has side effects:O

  • anonymous

    Wow, ya’ll even read the article?

  • mon

    Everything in moderation is mostly good . . anything in excess no matter how good may always have some undesirable side effects. . .

  • Jimit Shah

    Thanks for sharing.

  • JOE

    I HAVE BEEN DRINKING GREEN TEA FOR OVER 50 YEARS ONLY SIDE EFFECT OTHER THAN GOOD HEALTH IS A SLIGHT DIURETIC EFFECT OUTSTANDINGLY SAFE PRODUCT

  • Akhlesh Narayan Shukla

    Must read..

  • Akhlesh Narayan Shukla

    may be use full informatio..must read and share…

  • maheen

    last 15 years daily i drink grean tea no side effect nothing…goma happnd…its talkin about only caffeine side effects…The green tea helps from 1000 disease ….

  • Praveen

    decaffinated green tea is worthless…please investgate and update this article…good prporties of green tea are lost in the decaffination process

  • Tg Padmanabhan

    we all have been brought up on mother`s milk. Cow is our mother; so drink only cow`s milk and keep away from tea, coffee !!

  • sangeeta

    Its just been 2 days since self has started with Organic TULSI tea but feels good. What do you advice? ?

  • Anonymous

    Hai, recently I started drinking green tea, now. I stop it ….! Fine information. My age is 56 / male . With 74 kg wt. 5’9″ ht..

  • Sudhir Kumar Kalra

    Hello Aparajita, thanks for sharing information relating to side effects of Green Tea. I suffer from hyper acidity, therefore I switched to Green Tea. In a day, I took only three cups maximum. After few months once or twice I found acide reflux acting up. I think your information would help me to remain cautious while taking tea.

  • Nasir

    It’s very useful article informing the possible side affects of excess usage. I had been taking 4-5 cups of green tea a day for the last 7 to 8 years and during past year, I increased its consumption considerably in place of water – and the caffeine in it ((the presence of which in green tea is not known to many of us) has taken its toll and my problem of PBH got worsened recently leading to blockage and consequent UTI.

  • Kandie

    I have been taking green tea twice a day and I started having irregular heartbeats, feeling dizzy and feverish, like I started having symptoms of low iron. I know these symptoms because I was once on iron supplements and I had no idea it might be green tea until today. I thought it was because of sleeping less hours due to my studies and I continued consuming green tea since 2008 until now. My daughter heard on radio yesterday from an invited specialist that taking too much green tea is harmful and asked me to do the research since she realized the side effects of it match what I have been going through. I really am thankful that now I will start consuming the right amount and be aware of the side effects. Indeed too much of everything is not good.

    • http://www.stylecraze.com/ StyleCraze

      Hi Kandie, indeed, too much of anything isn’t good. Thank you for your valuable comment.