Top 5 High-fiber Food Groups That You Should Eat Regularly

Medically Reviewed by Kathie Madonna Swift, MS, RDN, LDN
Written by Swathi Handoo, MSc (Biotechnology), Professional Certificate In Food, Nutrition & Health

The role of fiber in promoting overall health is vital. From aiding weight loss to managing constipation, fiber plays a crucial role. Hence, including fiber-rich foods regularly in your diet can offer an array of health benefits. Many food groups offer abundant fiber. It is a type of carbohydrate that cannot be digested easily. It keeps the digestive system active too. Learn more about fiber, foods rich in this nutrient, and the optimum dosage of fiber. Scroll down to know more.

What Is Fiber? Why Do You Need It?

Fiber is a class of non-digestible, complex carbohydrates. It can be found in plants or is added to foods. The primary role of different classes of fiber is to act as prebiotics (1).

As prebiotics, they promote the activity of the good bacteria in the gut (gut microbiota). Another crucial role of fiber is to maintain blood cholesterol levels. This activity is particularly attributed to soluble fiber. Soluble fiber is commonly found in fruits, legumes, and oats (1).

The other class of fiber, insoluble fiber, is associated with the prevention of constipation and appetite control. Insoluble fiber is found in wheat, bran, and vegetables (1).

In this article, we have presented a list of high-fiber foods. We have categorized them into five major groups. You must have eaten a few or maybe all of them without knowing the amount of fiber they contain.

Scroll down and pick your favorites!

Top 7 Fiber-rich Food Groups

1. Vegetables

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VegetableServing SizeTotal Fiber (in grams)
Peas1 cup8.8
Artichokes1 medium6.5
Brussels sprouts1 cup6.4
Turnips (green, boiled)1 cup5.0
Broccoli (boiled)1 cup5.1
Potato (baked with skin)1 medium4.4
Corn1 cup4.2
Spinach1 cup4.0
 Collards (cooked)½ cup3.8
Sweet potato (baked in skin)1 medium3.8
Pumpkin (canned)½ cup3.6
Winter squash (cooked)½ cup2.9
Carrot (raw)1 medium2.0
Cauliflower (boiled)½ cup1.7
Onions (boiled)½ cup1

Source: (1), (2), (3)

2. Fruits (Fresh And Dried)

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FruitServing SizeTotal Fiber (in grams)
Pear (raw)1 medium5.1
Avocado½ cup5.0
Apple (with skin)1 medium4.4
Raspberries½ cup4.0
Blackberries½ cup3.8
Prunes (stewed)½ cup3.8
Figs (dried)2 medium3.7
Blueberries1 cup3.5
Strawberries1 cup3.3
Peaches (dried)3 halves3.2
Banana1 medium3.1
Orange1 medium3.1
Guava1 fruit3.0
Dates¼ cup2.9
Apricots (dried)10 halves2.6
Raisins1.5 oz.1.6

Source: (1), (2), (3)

3. Legumes And Lentils

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Legume/Bean/LentilServing SizeTotal Fiber (in grams)
Black beans (raw)1 cup30.1
Pink beans (raw)1 cup26.7
Adzuki beans (raw)1 cup25.0
Baked beans (canned)1 cup13.9
Lima beans1 cup13.2
Lentils1 cup15.6
Navy beans (cooked)½ cup9.6
Small white beans (cooked)½ cup9.3
Yellow beans (cooked)½ cup9.2
Cranberry (roman) (beans, cooked)½ cup8.9
French beans (cooked)½ cup8.3
Split peas (cooked)½ cup8.1
Chickpeas (cooked)½ cup7.8
Pinto beans (cooked)½ cup7.7
Mung beans (cooked)½ cup7.7
Kidney beans (all types, cooked)½ cup5.7
Pigeon peas (cooked)½ cup5.6
Cowpeas (cooked)½ cup5.6
Soybeans (cooked)½ cup5.2
Broad beans (fava beans) (cooked)½ cup4.6
Green peas (fresh, frozen) (cooked)½ cup3.5-4.4

Source: (2), (3), (4)

4. Nuts And Seeds

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Nuts/SeedsServing SizeTotal Fiber (in grams)
Sunflower seeds (toasted)1 cup15.4
European chestnuts1 cup11.7
Butternuts (dried)1 cup5.6
Pumpkin seeds (whole, roasted)1 oz.5.2
Coconut meat (desiccated)1 oz.4.6
Chia seeds (dried)1 tbsp4.1
Almonds24 nuts3.3
Pistachios (dry roasted)1 oz.2.8
Pecans (oil roasted)1 oz.2.7
Hazelnuts or filberts1 oz.2.7
Peanuts28 nuts2.3
Walnuts1 oz.2.0
Cashews18 nuts0.9

Source: (2), (3), (5), (6)

5. Grains, Cereals, Snacks, And Pasta

Shutterstock

Grain/CerealServing SizeTotal Fiber (in grams)
High-fiber bran ready-to-eat cereal⅓ – ¾ cup9.1-14.3
Spaghetti (whole wheat)1 cup6.3
Wheat bran flakes ready-to-eat cereal¾ cup4.9-5.5
Plain rye wafer crackers2 wafers5.0
Oatmeal1 cup4.0
Brown rice (cooked)1 cup3.5
Popcorn (air-popped)3 cups3.5
Pearled barley (cooked)½ cup3.0
Oat bran muffin1 small3.0
Whole wheat paratha bread1 oz.2.7
Quinoa (cooked)½ cup2.6
Bread (whole wheat)1 slice1.9
Pancakes1 medium1.0
White rice1 cup1.0

Source: (2), (3), (6)

Those are the exhaustive lists of high-fiber foods we compiled for you.

Hope you found your favorites in them. All you have to do is add them to your daily meals using fun and quick recipes.

But before you proceed, you should know how much fiber you should eat.

How Much Fiber Do You Need?

The amount of fiber you need depends on your age and gender. Following is the USDA recommendation:

AdultsChildren
Men1-3 Years
19-5038 gms(boys and girls)19 gms
50+ Years30 gms4-8 Years
Women(boys and girls)25 gms
19-50 years25 gms9-13 years
50+ years21 gmsBoys31 gms
Pregnant Womengirls26 gms
14-50 years28 gms14-18 years
Lacting WomenBoys38 gms
14-50 years28 gmsGirls26 gms

We also recommend you to schedule a session with a nutritionist/dietitian. They can frame a customized fiber-rich diet keeping your medical history in mind.

Fiber is a complex carbohydrate that does not get digested easily. This way, it helps increase satiety and reduce energy intake, leading to weight loss. It also helps manage constipation and cholesterol levels besides promoting the growth of gut-healthy bacteria. So, consuming high-fiber foods, especially vegetables, fruits, legumes, lentils, nuts, seeds, grains, and cereals, is advised to meet the daily recommended intake of this complex carbohydrate. Men and women aged between 19 and 50 must intake 38 g and 25 g of fiber every day, respectively, while those above 50 should consume 30g and 21g, respectively.

Sources

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Kathie Madonna Swift

(MS, RDN, LDN, FAND, EBQ)
Kathie Madonna Swift is the co-founder of the Integrative and Functional Nutrition Academy, an online, functional nutrition course for healthcare... more

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