23 Best Foods That Make You Poop And Relieve Constipation

Ease your bowels with apples, apricot, Brussel sprouts, chia seeds, grapes, and more.

Medically reviewed by Kelly McKenzie, Registered Clinical Nutritionist Kelly McKenzie Kelly McKenzieRegistered Clinical Nutritionist linkedin_icon
Written by , BSc, Professional Certificate in Food, Nutrition and Health Ravi Teja Tadimalla BSc, Professional Certificate in Food, Nutrition and Health Experience: 8 years
Edited by , BA (Literature & Psychology), PG Diploma Arshiya Syeda BA (Literature & Psychology), PG Diploma Experience: 7 years
Fact-checked by , BTech (Biotechnology), Certified Health & Nutrition Life Coach Sindhu Koganti BTech (Biotechnology), Certified Health & Nutrition Life Coach Experience: 6 years
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Constipation affects about 20% of the population (1).

Another study revealed that about half of surveyed adults in the U.S., or 47.8%, were on constipation medications. Out of which 93.5% used over-the-counter medications, followed by individuals taking prescription medicine which is 1.3%. And around 5.2% of the surveyed participants used both prescribed medication and over-the-counter treatments to treat constipation effectively.

In such cases, you must identify the foods that make you poop. Their benefits are important in the long run, and you never know when this information will come in handy. Inactivity, low fiber diets, or even aging can make pooping difficult. Although some laxativesi  Substances or agents that loosen the stool by adding bulk and increase the frequency of bowel movements, thereby relieving temporary constipation. , stool softeners, and fiber supplements can help, the best remedies could be certain foods that promote bowel movement. These natural foods include a range of fruits, cereals, and vegetables. Find out what foods help relieve constipation in this article. Keep reading!

What’s The Science Behind Poop?

Before we get to the list of foods, it is important we understand the science behind why we do what we do.

It makes sense – doesn’t it? For those who eat, there also must be a system that removes the leftovers post the digestion process. A bowel movement is a major way our body discards the waste. It compacts the leftovers into a mass (what we call feces or stool) and passes it through the rectum and anus. Our bowel movement is an indicator of our general health.

You might have seven to ten bowel movements in a week, or you might have two in a day. The patterns and frequency might change, but as far as everything else stays the same, this is a sign of good health.

Before we get ahead, we have something interesting to share. You probably are not pooping the right way. Eh? The following image will tell you why.

We are done with the positioning, which is one part of the equation. The other part is the intake.

What Are The Foods That Make You Poop?

Blanca Garcia, RDN, says, “High-fiber diets, consisting of fruits, vegetables, and whole grain products, have always been the game-changer – with regular exercise and enough fluid intake. Fruits that help best with constipation are apples, kiwis, prunes, pears, figs, sweet potatoes, and the list goes on.”

Some of the top foods that make you poop include:

  • Apples
  • Hot beverages
  • Apricots
  • Blueberries
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Chia seeds
  • Grapes
  • Grapefruit

Do blueberries make you poop? How do grapes make you poop? Wondering how all these fruits help you relieve constipation? Scroll down to know more.

1. Apples

Apple makes you poop
Image: Shutterstock

Apples are rich in fiber, which passes through your intestines undigested and promotes regular bowel movements (2). Apples also contain a soluble fiber called pectin, which has laxative effects. Pectin reduces the colon transit time, assists in reducing constipation, and improves digestive health as well (3).

Even apple cider vinegar is considered a good cure for constipation. Though there is no scientific research yet, certain sources claim that it acts as a laxative.

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Apple juice may also help with chronic constipation. The fructans in it are chemically stable and do not affect sensory sensations, and help ease constipation (14).

2. Hot Beverages

Hot liquids like tea and coffee are known to stimulate the bowels and ease constipation. As per studies, warm water can have favorable effects on intestinal movements (4).

3. Apricots

Apricots, especially Japanese apricots, were found to increase defecation frequency and contraction of the colon. These effects were observed in trials conducted on animals (5).

4. Blueberries

Blueberries makes you poop
Image: Shutterstock

Just like all fruits and berries, blueberries are also rich in dietary fiber that can ease symptoms of constipation and make you poop. Ensure you avoid canned blueberries – – as these may be additionally sweetened and may contain lesser nutrients.

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Blueberries are a low-FODMAP food that reduces the symptoms of irritable bowel syndromei  A disorder that affects the gastrointestinal tract and causes symptoms like cramps, bloating, abdominal pain, and diarrhea or constipation. and constipation to maintain a healthy digestive system (15).

5. Brussels Sprouts

How do Brussels sprouts make you poop? Let us find out here. These mini cabbages are good sources of fiber, which makes your stool bulky and helps you poop – potentially assisting in reducing constipation in the process. If you aren’t used to consuming a lot of fiber, start small, otherwise the fiber in the sprouts may not break down in the small intestine – ultimately leading to gas.

6. Chia Seeds

Chia seeds are not only high in fiber but also contain healthy fats and help absorb water. They may help treat constipation. These contain insoluble fiber that forms a gel as it comes in contact with water. This gel adds bulk to your stool, thereby promoting regularity (6). You can take about 1.5 tablespoons (20 grams) of chia seeds every day. Soaking the seeds before consuming is ideal, to potentially assist with ease of digestion.

7. Grapes

Grapes are rich in fiber, and can help ease constipation (5). Consuming just 10 grapes offers you about 2.6 grams of fiber. This may potentially help with your regularity issues.

8. Grapefruit

Even without its pith, the fruit seems to have laxative properties that can help relieve constipation and make you poop. Grapefruits contain about 2.3 grams of fiber per 154-gram serving (7).

But keep in mind that grapefruit juice might interfere with certain medications. Hence, if you are taking any other medication, do consult your doctor first.

9. Kombucha

Kombucha tea drink makes you poop
Image: Shutterstock

Kombucha is a variety of sweetened black or green tea drinks – and is commonly taken as a functional beverage. Fermented kombucha tea contains probiotics, which are known to help relieve constipation (8).

10. Kiwis

One medium kiwi has about 2 grams of fiber, which is a combination of the soluble and insoluble forms. This fiber in the fruit can help relieve constipation.

11. Lemon Water

Water is a natural lubricant that softens the stool. Lemons become alkalising once inside the body, and may work on the digestive system to get things moving. The two may make a powerful remedy for constipation. You can drink warm lemon water before bedtime. This may assist in loosening fecal matter during sleep. Just make sure that you rinse your mouth out well with water before cleaning your teeth, as the acidity of the lemon may degrade the enamel on your teeth.

12. Mangoes

Just like any fruit, mangoes are rich in fiber and help ease constipation. But what could be more effective are the phytochemicalsi  Natural compounds found in plant-based foodstuffs that impart color, flavor, and aroma to the food and also contribute to strengthening the immune system. in the mango pulp, which can enhance digestive health and help you poop. Phytochemicals are known to promote the health of gut microbiota, thereby promoting digestive health (9).

13. Oranges

One large juicy orange offers you about 4 grams of fiber for just 81 calories (10). In addition, oranges (and citrus fruits in general) contain a flavonoli  Compounds belonging to the flavonoid group containing anti-inflammatory properties which protect cells from oxidative damage and contributes to easing constipation. called naringenin, which, as per Chinese researchers, can work as a laxative and help you poop (11).

14. Oatmeal

Oatmeal makes you poop
Image: Shutterstock

Oatmeal is one of those breakfast foods that make you poop. One cup of regular oatmeal contains 4 grams of fiber, half of which is insoluble fiber. This can prevent constipation and help you poop.

15. Prunes

Prunes are often considered nature’s remedy for constipation due to two reasons. One, they are rich in insoluble fiber. And two, they also contain a natural laxative called sorbitol.

16. Quinoa

It’s fiber, again. Quinoa contains twice as much fiber as most other grains. Hence, it can make you poop and ease your constipation troubles.

17. Raisins

Do raisins make you poop? Yes, they do. Being dried fruits, raisins contain concentrated amounts of fiber – and this can treat constipation and trigger poop.

18. Spinach

One cup of spinach contains 4 grams of fiber, and that’s a reason good enough for anyone to take it to ease constipation. More importantly, spinach also contains magnesium – a mineral that helps the colon contract and draws water in to flush things through. Kale is another leafy vegetable that may help to ease constipation.

19. Yogurt

Though yogurt contains probiotics and can help ease constipation, some sources say it can, instead, cause the condition. Hence, talk to your doctor before using yogurt for this purpose.

20. Cabbage

Does cabbage make you poop too? No need to be shocked and confused. It is super rich in dietary fiber, with one cup of cabbage offering close to 2 grams (12). The fiber in this veggie may reduce constipation symptoms and ensure that your stool passes smoothly.

21. Coconut Water

Coconut water can work wonders on your bowels as it is one of the best natural laxatives. It offers a natural hydration boost, and given it has a high electrolyte content, it can ease constipation symptoms.

22. Corn

Corn food makes you poop
Image: Shutterstock

Corn is one superb source of insoluble fiber, the type of fiber your body cannot digest. This fiber acts like a scrub brush and sweeps your colon clean. This can make you poop. Thus, these are the foods to make you poop and relieve constipation.

23. Herbal Teas

Herbal teas can help you achieve a healthier digestive system. Herbs such as senna, ginger, dandelion, and peppermint possess laxative properties and help relieve constipation.

While senna stimulates bowel movements, ginger and peppermint help relax intestinal muscles, reduce spasms, and soothe the digestive tract, reducing abdominal discomfort (16), (17), (18). Dandelion tea acts as a mild diuretic and laxative, helping clear out excess fluid and waste (19).

Drinking a mix of these herbal teas not only provides relief from digestive ailments but also introduces a variety of flavors and aromas to your palate. Regular consumption of herbal teas can promote overall well-being. However, remember to consult a healthcare professional before introducing any new herbs into your diet if you are under medication.

The author of the health-conscious blog Healthy We discusses the profound impact of constipation on health, highlighting its mood, energy, and cognitive effects. They write that prolonged constipation can lead to serious health issues, including gastrointestinal disorders and colon cancer. After changing their lifestyle and food habits, the blogger notes, “It looks like a lot of things but you gotta to do what you gotta do! I can say that I feel much better, healthier, lighter and nicer in life. My brain is sharper, my energy levels are higher, my joint pains have vanished, stomach aches and bloating are a thing of the past and now there’s not a lazy bone in my body anymore (i)”.

Infographic: Lifestyle Changes To Ease Constipation

Constipation may become unmanageable at times. However, one can ease the condition with a few lifestyle changes, exercises, and yogasanas. The following infographic provides information about these small but effective changes. Check it out!

lifestyle changes to ease constipation (infographic)

Illustration: StyleCraze Design Team

Consuming foods that make you poop is an effective way to manage constipation. Apples, grapes, blueberries, Brussel sprouts, chia seeds, lemon water, oatmeal, spinach, yogurt, and corn are some foods that can ease constipation. Broccoli, lentils, almonds, avocado, watermelon, rhubarb, beets, artichokes, carrots, celery, cucumbers, papaya, tomatoes, ginger, turmeric, and cayenne pepper are some other foods that may ease constipation. These are high in fiber that is known for managing constipation. In addition, adequate hydration, moderate physical activity, and a balanced diet help manage constipation and promote overall health.

Frequently Asked Questions

Should I keep eating if I am constipated?

Elizabeth Quinn, Certified Nutrition Specialist, says, “You should continue to eat if you are constipated. When your body digests food, it stimulates contractions along your digestive tract that can help to move things out of the bowel. Make sure to eat high-fiber foods like beans, peas, and whole grains.”

How much fiber do I need to poop regularly?

For an average American, the RDA of fiber is 38 grams for men and 25 grams for women (between the ages of 19 and 50 years). Beyond that, it is 30 grams per day for men and 21 grams per day for women (13). Meeting the RDA of fiber may ensure better colon health.

What foods to consume for solid stools?

Bananas, applesauce, rice, and toast are some of the stool-firming foods.

Any natural laxative foods?

Most of the foods you saw above are potentially good natural laxatives. Some other natural laxative foods include flaxseeds and aloe vera.

Does protein make you poop?

Excess protein can cause constipation as more water is needed to digest the protein. Protein is key, but don’t take it in excess.

Does pooping make you lose weight?

A diet high in protein may result in constipation; this is potentially due to the possible lack of fibre in one’s diet as well as lack of water. Protein is essential for health, but in excess it may cause constipation. Hence, a whole food diet that includes plenty of fibrous vegetables is key.

Does applesauce make you poop?

Yes. Applesauce has a soluble fiber called pectin that helps with gut barrier function. This may help improve digestion and make you poop (14).

Key Takeaways

  • Around 20% of the population suffers from constipation and the common reasons are inactivity, low-fiber diets, or even aging.
  • The squatting position fully relaxes the muscles and helps empty the colon easier and faster.
  • Fluids like warm beverages, coconut water, and lemon water help in digestion and relieve constipation.
  • Include kiwi, apples, oatmeal, and corn in your diet, as they all help in digestion.

foods that make you poop_illustration

Image: Dall·E/StyleCraze Design Team


References

Articles on StyleCraze are backed by verified information from peer-reviewed and academic research papers, reputed organizations, research institutions, and medical associations to ensure accuracy and relevance. Read our editorial policy to learn more.

  1. “Epidemiology and management of chronic constipation in elderly patients” Clinical Interventions in Aging, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4459612/
  2. “Mechanism of action of dietary fibre in the human colon” Nature, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7360261
  3. “Clinical benefits after soluble dietary fiber supplementation: a randomized clinical trial in adults with slow-transit constipation” Zhongua Yi Xue Za Zhi, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25623312
  4. “The Effect of Warm Water Intake on Bowel Movements in the Early Postoperative Stage of Patients Having Undergone Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial” Gastroenterology Nursing, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27684632
  5. “Diets for Constipation” Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology & Nutrition, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4291444/
  6. “Healthy food trends – Chia seeds” Florida Health Finder.
    https://quality.healthfinder.fl.gov/healthencyclopedia/Health%20Illustrated%20Encyclopedia/60/000727.aspx
  7. “Grapefruit, raw, pink and red, all areas” USDA National Nutrient Database.
    https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/174673/nutrients
  8. “Fermented foods” University of Michigan.
    https://www.med.umich.edu/pfans/_pdf/hetm-2017/0717-fermentedfoods.pdf
  9. “Phytochemicals as antibiotic alternatives to promote growth and enhance host health” Veterinary Research, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6066919/#Sec9title
  10. “Oranges, raw, all commercial varieties” USDA National Nutrient Database.
    https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/169097/nutrients
  11. “Naringenin induces laxative effects by upregulating the expression levels of c-Kit and SCF, as well as those of aquaporin 3 in mice with loperamide-induced constipation” International Journal of Molecular Medicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29207043
  12. “Cabbage, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt” USDA National Nutrient Database.
    https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/169976/nutrients
  13. “Closing America’s Fiber Intake Gap” American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6124841/
  14. “Apple-Derived Pectin Modulates Gut Microbiota, Improves Gut Barrier Function, and Attenuates Metabolic Endotoxemia in Rats with Diet-Induced Obesity” Nutrients, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26938554/
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Kelly McKenzie is a Registered Clinical Nutritionist with 3 years of experience, based in Auckland, New Zealand. She is the founder of All About Nutrition, a nutrition consultancy that takes a holistic approach to their clients health and wellbeing. Kelly is passionate about wellbeing and believes that our food and environment speak to our genes, contributing to either health or...read full bio

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