Top 10 Foods To Eat For A Healthy Uterus

A list of all the nutritious and delicious food that can keep your uterus in good health.

Medically Reviewed by Tracy Tredoux, DipION, mBANT, CNHC, AFMCP
By Tanya Choudhary

In a woman’s body, the uterus is a vital organ. It forms the basis of a woman’s reproductive system and plays a pivotal role in the foundation of life. Therefore, it is important that every woman consume food for a healthy uterus. There are a great variety of readily available and nutritious foods that enhance uterine health.

When you are trying to conceive, it is wise to research uterus-strengthening foods so that you can give your child the best foundation on their life’s journey. This article discusses and lists “what to eat” in order to have ideal uterine health.

Keep reading to find out which foods to include in your diet for a healthy and happy uterus.

Food for Healthy Uterus – Top 10 Foods

Here are the top 10 foods for a healthy uterus that enhance uterine health:

1. Fiber:

Image: Shutterstock

Eating a diet rich in fiber can help eliminate the wastes and toxins from your body (1). Don’t worry if you have 2 to 3 bowel movements a day. It is healthy. Also, a high fiber diet can help remove excessive estrogen that may be stored in your body (2). This prevents the formation of uterine fibroids (3). Look at beans, legumes, vegetables, fruits, and whole grains as a source of fiber. Try to eat organic food as it will be free from chemicals and pesticides. These unwanted chemicals could harm your chances of conceiving (4), (5). Also, when eating a high fiber diet, it is important you drink about 8 to 10 glasses of water every day. It will ease the movement of fiber through your digestive tract (6).

2. Vegetables:

Image: Shutterstock

Vegetables are a great source of calcium, potassium, magnesium, and vitamins. Eat a diet rich in vegetables to reduce the risk of fibroids. Vegetables also can also slow down the progress of fibroid tumors as long as you eat vegetables, such as legumes, cabbage, bok choy, and broccoli (7). These vegetables are rich in phytoestrogens. Phytoestrogens have the ability to compete with the body’s estrogen. Thus, phytoestrogens help to bring down your estrogen levels (8), thereby halting the growth of tumors in your uterus.

3. Fruits:

image:Shutterstock

Fruits, rich in vitamin C and bioflavonoids, may help in impeding the growth of fibroids in your uterus (9). They can also normalize your estrogen levels. So make sure you eat a good dose of fruits. Bioflavonoids may also prevent ovarian cancer and may help in keeping your reproductive system healthy (10). In fact, try to eat fruits in between meals when you feel hungry. This will stop you from eating junk and also supply the nutrients required by your uterus to stay healthy.

4. Dairy Products:

Image: Shutterstock

Daily consumption of dairy products like yogurt, cheese, milk, and butter is essential for uterine health (11). These dairy products are rich in calcium and vitamin D. While calcium helps to keep your bones healthy, vitamin D plays a vital role in reducing the risk of uterine fibroids (12), (13). You also need vitamin D to help in the absorption of calcium (14).

5. Green Tea:

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Green tea is filled with antioxidants. They not only help maintain a healthy uterus but may also aid in treating fibroids in the uterus. According to herbal specialists, women with uterine fibroids should drink green tea regularly for around 8 weeks. This may help in the reduction of the number of fibroids (15).

6. Cold Water Fish:

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Fish that thrive in cold water, such as mackerel and salmon, are rich in omega-3 essential fatty acids. They help to reduce the production of prostaglandin in the female body (16). This is a hormone-like compound that can cause severe contraction of the uterus. Due to the severity of the contraction, it can sometimes cause the uterus to get malpositioned.

7. Lemon:

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We all know that lemons are rich in vitamin C and they help to boost our immune system (17). The vitamin also aids in improving the immunity of your uterus. When this happens, your uterus will be better equipped to ward off bacteria, thereby, preventing infections. Consume a glass of warm water with a lemon squeezed into it every day in the morning. This may help improve the health of your uterus. However, the research is limited in this regard.

8. Greens:

Image: Shutterstock

Greens, like kale, spinach, collard greens and stinging nettles, help to maintain the alkaline balance of your uterus. They also provide minerals for the optimal functioning of your nervous system. You can make  tea from stinging nettle and consume 2 to 4 cups every day. You can also add other green vegetables to your diet. You will get all the nutrients, including folic acid, to ensure your uterus is ready to create a healthy baby.

9. Nuts and Seeds:

Image: Shutterstock

Seeds and nuts are needed by your body for optimal production of hormones. Consume seeds and nuts, such as almonds, flaxseeds, and cashew nuts. They are rich in omega-3 fatty acids and good cholesterol. The omega-3 fatty acids may help in eliminating fibroids and also reduce the risk of uterine cancer (18). The good cholesterol helps maintain your serum cholesterol level. It also prevents the birth of a premature baby or a low-weight full-term baby (19).

10. Castor Oil:

Image: Shutterstock

Many of you may remember castor oil from your childhood days when your mother forced you to consume a teaspoon to ease constipation and clean out your system. Well, anecdotal evidence suggests that ingestion of castor oil (yuck!) may help treat ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids. In addition, the presence of ricinoleic acid in castor oil helps to strengthen your immune system. As a result, it makes the uterus more resistant to infections.

I tried a combination of these foods to keep my uterus healthy. They helped me tremendously. Hope it works well for you also. Do let me know what you tried by dropping your feedback in the comments section below.

Foods for a healthy uterus include fiber-rich foods like fruits, legumes, vegetables, and whole grains. Dairy products, green tea, cold-water fish, lemons, green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, and castor oil also help. In addition, following a well-balanced diet, exercising moderately, and maintaining an active lifestyle help promote uterus health and overall well-being. However, please consult your doctor before adding these foods to your diet – especially if you have a preexisting medical condition.

Frequently Asked Questions

How can I keep my uterus healthy?

You should eat a healthy and balanced diet to keep your uterus strong and healthy. Additionally, staying hydrated, regular physical exercise, and managing your stress can keep your uterus healthy.

Which exercise is best for the uterus?

Kegel exercises and yoga can strengthen your pelvic floor muscles and boost blood circulation (20).

How do you know if your uterus is healthy?

You can get regular checkups done to understand the health of your uterus. If you experience pelvic pain, spotting, vaginal itching or burning, consult your doctor.

Sources

Articles on StyleCraze are backed by verified information from peer-reviewed and academic research papers, reputed organizations, research institutions, and medical associations to ensure accuracy and relevance. Read our editorial policy to learn more.

  1. Dietary Fiber Atherosclerosis and Cardiovascular Disease
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC6566984/
  2. High-fiber diet reduces serum estrogen concentrations in premenopausal women
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1652197/
  3. Nutrition in Gynecological Diseases Current Perspectives
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC8065992/
  4. Environmental Contaminants Affecting Fertility and Somatic Health
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC6425478/
  5. Reproductive disorders associated with pesticide exposure
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18032334/
  6. Water supplementation enhances the effect of high-fiber diet on stool frequency and laxative consumption in adult patients with functional constipation
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9684123/
  7. Vegetarian diet and reduced uterine fibroids risk A case-control study in Nanjing China
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26458740/
  8. Phytoestrogen
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/phytoestrogen
  9. Micronutrient and Trace Element Levels in Serum of Women With Uterine Fibroids in Lagos
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34765381/
  10. In vitro response of human ovarian cancer cells to dietary bioflavonoid isoquercitrin
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31271108/
  11. Dairy and related nutrient intake and risk of uterine leiomyoma a prospective cohort study
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32086510/
  12. Calcium and bone
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22609892/
  13. Can vitamin D reduce the risk of uterine fibroids?
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC4209245/
  14. Calcium and Vitamin D: Skeletal and Extraskeletal Health
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC2669834/
  15. Treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids with green tea extract: a pilot randomized controlled clinical study
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC3742155/
  16. Role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the production of prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide during experimental murine paracoccidioidomycosis
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24455741/
  17. Vitamin C and Immune Function
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC5707683/
  18. Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid intakes and endometrial cancer risk in a population-based case–control study
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC3548981/
  19. Preterm delivery and low maternal serum cholesterol level Any correlation?
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC4178338/
  20. Effects of Kegel exercises for the management of pelvic floor muscles weakness after episiotomy
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/347443797_Effects_of_Kegel_exercises_for_the_management_of_pelvic_floor_muscles_weakness_after_episiotomy
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author
Tanya is an ISSA certified Specialist in Fitness & Nutrition. She specializes in writing articles on ingredients that benefit skin,... more

Tracy Tredoux

(DipION, mBANT, CNHC, AFMCP)
Tracy is a fully qualified nutritional therapist who specializes in gut and immune health. She is a Functional Diagnostic Nutrition... more

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