10 Health Benefits & Nutrition Values Of Bignay

Medically Reviewed by Reda Elmardi, RDN
By Tanya Choudhary

Bignay, also known as Queensland cherry, is a nutrient-loaded fruit found in Malaysia and Singapore. This red-hued fruit is usually the size of a gooseberry. Bignay benefits are slowly gaining popularity among many health enthusiasts. Even the leaves of this plant offer an array of health benefits.

As per health experts, the Bignay tea, which is made from the bark of this tree, has many positive effects on health. The tea can aid in weight loss, promote heart health, and lower cholesterol levels. Read further to know more about the other health benefits of the Bignay fruit. Continue reading.

Health Benefits of Bignay Fruit

1. Natural Source Of Antioxidants

The natural anti-oxidative properties of this fruit, due to the presence of catechins, enable it to fight against the free radicals present in the human body (1), (2). The excessive presence of these radicals can result in premature onset of wrinkles, fine lines, and even cause cancer (3). The absence of antioxidants can result in the above-mentioned conditions. You can now keep all these at bay by consumption of Bignay, as whole fruit, or as tea.

Bignay also contains mangiferin, a polyphenol antioxidant that prevents oxidation of LDL cholesterol and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (4).

2. Used In The Treatment Of Syphilis

Syphilis is an infection transmitted sexually. Studies conducted on this plant have revealed that the leaves of this tree, when boiled, have the potential to treat Syphilis (5).

3. May Treat Urinary Tract Infections

Bignay is known to offer relief from infections that affect the urinary tract. However, limited scientific evidence is available to prove this claim.

4. Keeps Your Blood Pressure Levels Under Control

Bignay, in the form of fruit and leaves, has the potential to keep the levels of blood pressure under control. Thus, it could be consumed by people suffering from hypertension to thwart off various hypertension-induced cardiovascular issues (6).

5. Natural Antidote For Snake Bites

The matured leaves of bignay have been used in alternative medicines by Asian physicians to treat snake bites.

6. Helps You Lose Weight

Bignay tea is known to possess appetite-suppressing properties (7). Thus, drinking a cup of this tea half an hour before each meal can help you lose weight in a better way.

7. Natural Remedy For Constipation

Bignay fruit when consumed in large quantities is known to render a laxative effect. Hence, it can be used, in a restricted way, to offer relief to those who are suffering from constipation (8).

8. May Do Good For Your Colon

Bignay tea is a well-known natural colon cleanser. Therefore, you can make use of this tea to eliminate unwanted toxins from your body. The natural detoxifying properties of the tea can help you lose weight while helping you look younger. It is also known to improve digestion and thus, beneficial for your colon. However, limited data is available to prove these claims.

9. Good For The Liver

According to a study conducted by mice, bignay fruit extracts can help to keep your liver healthier (9). However, more human studies are needed to understand this benefit of bignay.

10. Good For Healthier Immune System

Bignay tea is known to pep up your metabolisms levels (10). The better the metabolism levels, the lower the infections will be. Thus, Bignay benefits to boost the power of your immune system.

11. May Help Fight Inflammation Associated With Arthritis

The mangiferin in Bignay has anti-inflammatory properties. It may help fight the inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis and reduce the risk of joint destruction (11).

How To Use Bignay?

You can use the fruit to make brandy, vine, and vinegar. A natural flavoring agent, it is used popularly for making juices and jams. The berries can also be consumed raw, while the leaves can be used in salads.

Side Effects Of Bignay

The fruits and leaves of this plant are edible but stay away from the roots as they are poisonous. Pregnant women should stay away from these berries as Bignay is known to cause abortion. However, there is not enough scientific evidence to prove these claims.

Bignay Nutrition Facts

The food value given is for per 100 grams of the fruit.

Moisture91.11-94.80 g
Protein0.75 g
Ash0.57-0.78 g
Calcium0.12 mg
Phosphorus0.04 mg
Iron0.001 mg
Thiamine0.031 mg
Riboflavin0.072 mg
Niacin0.53 mg

Bignays are small red fruits native to Southeast Asia that are packed with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. Bignay’s benefits include better immunity, improved metabolism, and reduced blood pressure levels. They also are natural colon cleansers and may relieve constipation and help ease digestive problems. You can consume bignays in various ways; in vinegar, in jams and juices, in salads, or even raw. However, bignays are anecdotally reported to cause miscarriage. Thus, pregnant women should avoid them and consult their doctor.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is bignay good for kidneys?

Yes, bignay herbal tea may help improve a few kidney disorders (12). However, most herbal teas used for therapeutic treatments may have high lead content. Though bignay contains lead in permissible amounts, excess intake for prolonged periods may cause health complications. Therefore, consult your doctor before including bignay tea in your daily routine.

Is bignay good for diabetes?

Maybe. Animal research suggests that bignay crude extracts may help lower blood sugar levels (13). However, more human studies are required to prove its efficacy.

What does bignay taste like?

Bignay tastes a bit acidic when raw and slightly sweet when ripe.

Sources

Articles on StyleCraze are backed by verified information from peer-reviewed and academic research papers, reputed organizations, research institutions, and medical associations to ensure accuracy and relevance. Read our editorial policy to learn more.

  1. Analysis of Anthocyanin, Flavonoids, and Phenolic Acids in Tropical Bignay Berries
    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15538360802365913
  2. Acute oral toxicity assessment of ethanolic extracts of Antidesma bunius (L.) Spreng fruits in mice
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/pmc/articles/PMC8246092/
  3. Free radicals and intrinsic skin aging: Basic principles
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267033808_Free_radicals_and_intrinsic_skin_aging_Basic_principles
  4. Mangiferin: a natural miracle bioactive compound against lifestyle related disorders
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5414237/
  5. Biological Activity of Bignay [ Antidesma bunius (L.) Spreng] Crude Extract in Artemia salina
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/46031870_Biological_Activity_of_Bignay_Antidesma_bunius_L_Spreng_Crude_Extract_in_Artemia_salina
  6. Determination of some chemical compounds of bignay (Antidesma bunius) fruit juice
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/345777274_Determination_of_some_chemical_compounds_of_bignay_Antidesma_bunius_fruit_juice/fulltext/5fadb573a6fdcc9389b1e2ca/Determination-of-some-chemical-compounds-of-bignay-Antidesma-bunius-fruit-juice.pdf
  7. TRADITIONAL PLANTS UTILIZED BY INDIGENOUS PEOPLE ”HERBOLARIOS”
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/332857567_TRADITIONAL_PLANTS_UTILIZED_BY_INDIGENOUS_PEOPLE_HERBOLARIOS
  8. A review on phytochemical and pharmacological potentials of Antidesma bunius
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/328491585_A_review_on_phytochemical_and_pharmacological_potentials_of_Antidesma_bunius
  9. Acute oral toxicity assessment of ethanolic extracts of Antidesma bunius (L.) Spreng fruits in mice
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/352501985_Acute_oral_toxicity_assessment_of_ethanolic_extracts_of_Antidesma_bunius_L_Spreng_fruits_in_mice
  10. In vitro lipid-lowering properties of the fruits of two bignay [Antidesma bunius (L.) Spreng] cultivars as affected by maturity stage and thermal processing
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2666566221000113
  11. Mangiferin: A promising therapeutic agent for rheumatoid arthritis treatment
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25204703/
  12. Lead Levels in Fresh Medicinal Herbs and Commercial Tea Products from Manila, Philippines
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212670814002036
  13. Antiglycemic effect of Bignay (Antidesma bunius) flavonoids in Sprague-Dawley rats
    https://research.lpubatangas.edu.ph/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/STETH-4.1.pdf
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author
Tanya is an ISSA certified Specialist in Fitness & Nutrition. She specializes in writing articles on ingredients that benefit skin,... more

Reda Elmardi

(RDN)
Reda Elmardi is a registered dietician, certified nutritionist, and certified strength and conditioning specialist trainer. He has more than 10... more

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