22 Home Remedies To Get Rid Of Rashes On The Face + Diet And Prevention Tips

Replace those pricey lotions with some natural alternatives to gain comfort right away.

Medically reviewed by Dr. Jyoti Gupta, MD Dr. Jyoti Gupta Dr. Jyoti GuptaMD facebook_iconyoutube_iconinsta_icon
Written by , MSc Shaheen Naser MSc linkedin_icon Experience: 3 years
Edited by , BTech Anjali Sayee BTech linkedin_icon Experience: 7 years
Fact-checked by , MA (English Literature) Swathi E MA (English Literature) linkedin_icon Experience: 3 years
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We all develop rashes from time to time. They are itchy, painful, distressing, and frustrating. While they go away on their own, sometimes they can be a symptom of an underlying medical condition. If you are looking for rash removal on the face, you have certainly come to the right place. In this article, we explore some of the causes of skin rashes and a few simple remedies you can try to get face rash relief in a few minutes.

What Causes Skin Rashes?

The causes of non-infectious rashes are:

  • Allergies
  • Reactions to medicinal drugs
  • Dry skin
  • Hypersensitivity to plants like poison ivy
  • Autoimmune conditions
  • Food allergies

Board-certified dermatologist Dr. Anna Chacon, MD, FAAD, describes a commonly observed allergic skin rash. She says, “A big, red rash may result from allergic contact dermatitis on the face. Dry, crusty skin and little red pimples may also be present.”

The causes of infectious rashes include:

  • Fungal infections caused by Trichophyton, Candida, etc.
  • Viral infections like herpes simplex, herpes zoster, HIV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)
  • Infections caused by bacteria like Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Pseudomonas, etc.
  • Parasites like lice and mites

A survey conducted estimated 35.5 million inpatient visits in 2018. Out of these 35.5 million patients, 666,235 patients were diagnosed with fungal infections. It was noted that 76.3% were Aspergillus, Pneumocystis, and Candida infections. Furthermore, 6.6 million outpatient visits due to fungal infections were seen in 2018.

Rashes can be quite troublesome in the long run. Dr. Chacon adds, “It might be an allergic response, a drug reaction, or an internal reason if your rash develops blisters or if it becomes open sores. If a blistering rash appears on your skin and spreads to your lips, genitals, or the skin around your eyes, you should see a doctor.” You can follow the remedies discussed below to soothe them and accelerate healing.

Note: The remedies discussed below may help ease the symptoms of a rash. However, if the rash persists for more than a week, consult your healthcare provider to test for any underlying causes.

Home Remedies For Skin Rashes

  1. Essential Oils
  2. Apple Cider Vinegar
  3. Coconut Oil
  4. Baking Soda
  5. Aloe Vera
  6. Epsom Salt
  7. Petroleum Jelly
  8. Castor Oil
  9. Breast Milk
  10. Hydrogen Peroxide
  11. Manuka Honey
  12. Green Tea
  13. Neem Oil
  14. Lemon Juice
  15. Oatmeal
  16. Garlic
  17. Ginger
  18. Grapefruit Seed Extract
  19. Jojoba Oil
  20. Onion Juice
  21. Carrot Juice
  22. Humidifiers

1. Essential Oils

Some essential oils can help soothe rashes
Image: Shutterstock

a. Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help reduce skin inflammation and redness associated with rashes, eczema treatment, rosacea treatment, and dermatitis treatment. It is also antiseptic and antimicrobial, which helps prevent further infections (1). 

You Will Need
  • 12 drops of tea tree oil
  • 30 mL of any carrier oil (coconut or jojoba oil)
What You Have To Do
  1. Add 12 drops of tea tree oil to 30 mL of any carrier oil.
  2. Apply this mixture to the affected areas.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this at least once daily, preferably before going to bed.

b. Lavender Oil

Lavender oil has anti-inflammatory and analgesici  The property or drug that relieves pain without numbing the nerves or altering sensory perception during medical procedures. properties (2). It can help soothe and reduce the swelling, pain, and inflammation associated with skin rashes.

You Will Need
  • 12 drops of lavender oil
  • 30 mL of coconut or olive oil
What You Have To Do
  1. Mix 12 drops of lavender oil with 30 ml of coconut oil.
  2. Apply this mixture to the affected areas.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this at least once daily.

c. Eucalyptus Oil

One of the major constituents of eucalyptus oil is eucalyptol. This compound has cooling, soothing, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties that can accelerate healing and provide skin allergy relief (3).

You Will Need
  • 12 drops of eucalyptus oil
  • 30 mL of any carrier (coconut or jojoba oil)
What You Have To Do
  1. Add 12 drops of eucalyptus oil to 30 mL of any carrier oil.
  2. Mix well and apply to the rashes.
  3. Leave it on overnight.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily.

2. Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties (4). This may help treat skin rashes and ease the symptoms. However, more scientific studies are needed to prove this effect.

You Will Need
  • 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar
  • ½ cup of water
  • Cotton pads
What You Have To Do
  1. Add a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar to half a cup of water.
  2. Soak a cotton pad in this mixture and apply it to the rashes.
  3. Allow the mixture to be absorbed completely.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 2 times daily. 

Zoe, a beauty and lifestyle blogger, tried using apple cider vinegar as a toner to treat facial rashes. She writes, “I recommend that if you are looking for a way to clear it up then this is a good start (i).”

3. Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is proven to exhibit strong anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antimicrobial activities (5), (6). These activities can soothe the existing rashes and prevent their recurrence. It is a great acne rash removal remedy.

You Will Need

Coconut oil (as required)

What You Have To Do
  1. Take a little coconut oil in your palm and apply it gently to the affected areas.
  2. Leave it on for 30 to 60 minutes before washing it off.
  3. You can also leave it on overnight.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily. 

4. Baking Soda

Baking soda neutralizes the pH of your skin. It also has an antipruritic effect on rashes (7). However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to prove the effect of baking soda in treating skin rashes.

You Will Need
  • 1 teaspoon of baking soda
  • Water (as required)
What You Have To Do
  1. Mix the baking soda with water to make a thick paste.
  2. Apply this mixture to the rashes and allow it to dry.
  3. Wash the baking soda mixture off your skin with plain water.

Caution: Do a patch test before using baking soda on your skin.

How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily. 

5. Aloe Vera

Aloe vera gel can help heal skin rashes
Image: Shutterstock

Aloe vera gel is highly recommended for skin rashes due to its healing and anti-inflammatory properties (8). This gel is also antimicrobial, which helps prevent the recurrence of the infection.

You Will Need

Aloe gel (as required)

What You Have To Do
  1. Scrape a little fresh aloe gel from the aloe plant.
  2. Apply it directly to the rashes on your face and skin.
  3. Leave it on for at least 30 minutes before washing off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 1 to 2 times daily.

6. Epsom Salt

Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) has anti-inflammatory properties (9). Hence, it can be used for treating the inflammation, swelling, and itchiness associated with skin rashes.

You Will Need
  • 1 cup of Epsom salt
  • Water
What You Have To Do
  1. Add a cup of Epsom salt to a tub of water.
  2. Soak in the Epsom salt bath for 20 to 30 minutes.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily or every alternate day.

7. Petroleum Jelly

Petroleum jelly forms a protective layer on your skin, enhancing your natural skin barrier, and prevents microbial infections while keeping your skin well moisturized. In one study, Vaseline, along with other antibiotics and antihistaminesi  A class of drugs that blocks histamine, a substance the body releases during infection, to relieve allergy symptoms. , was shown to improve facial rash in one week of continued use (10). In such cases, the timing of facial rash diagnosis is also crucial.

You Will Need

Petroleum jelly (as required)

What You Have To Do
  1. Apply a little petroleum jelly gently to the affected area.
  2. Leave it on and reapply as and when required.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this multiple times daily, as per your requirement.

Note: Petroleum jelly can also be used to treat diaper rashes in babies.

8. Castor Oil

The presence of ricinoleic acid in castor oil gives it anti-inflammatory properties that can help reduce inflammation, swelling, and itchiness (11). It is commonly used to treat many skin disorders (12).

You Will Need

2 teaspoons of castor oil

What You Have To Do
  1. Apply a little castor oil to the affected areas.
  2. Leave it on for at least 30 minutes before washing it off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily.

Caution: Do a patch test before following this remedy as some individuals could be sensitive to castor oil. 

9. Breast Milk

Breast milk moisturizes your baby’s skin and protects it from further infections. It can also help treat other skin problems (13).

You Will Need

A few drops of breast milk

What You Have To Do
  1. Apply a few drops of breast milk to the rashes on your baby’s skin.
  2. Allow it to dry and reapply as required.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 1 to 2 times daily.

10. Hydrogen Peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide has antibacterial properties (14). Hence, it may help in treating infectious rashes and prevent further infections. However, there is insufficient evidence to prove this effect.

You Will Need
  • 3% hydrogen peroxide
  • Cotton balls
What You Have To Do
  1. Dip a cotton ball in hydrogen peroxide and apply it directly to the rashes.
  2. Allow it to dry and wash it off with water.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 1 to 2 times daily.

Caution: Do not try this remedy if you have sensitive skin.

11. Manuka Honey

Manuka honey helps reduce rashes
Image: Shutterstock

Manuka honey is quite popular for its powerful anti-inflammatory and healing properties, and it helps reduce swelling and inflammation (15).

You Will Need

  • 1 tablespoon of manuka honey
  • 2 teaspoons of olive oil
What You Have To Do
  1. Mix a tablespoon of manuka honey with two teaspoons of olive oil.
  2. Apply the mixture to the affected areas.
  3. Leave it on for 30 to 60 minutes before washing it off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this at least once daily.

12. Green Tea

Green tea contains beneficial polyphenolsi  A naturally occurring plant micronutrient that can benefit your skin because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. that protect your skin from free radical damage due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties (16),(17). This helps soothe the rash and prevent its recurrence.

You Will Need
  • 1 teaspoon of green tea
  • 1 cup of hot water
  • Cotton pads
What You Have To Do
  1. Add a teaspoon of green tea to a cup of hot water.
  2. Allow it to steep for 5 to 10 minutes.
  3. Keep it aside to cool.
  4. Dip a cotton pad into the tea and apply it to the affected areas.
  5. Leave it on for at least 30 minutes before washing it off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily. 

13. Neem Oil

Neem oil exhibits anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and antihistamine activities, which treat skin rashes and their symptoms like inflammation and redness (18), (19).

You Will Need

A few drops of neem oil

What You Have To Do
  1. Apply neem oil directly to the rashes on your body and face.
  2. Leave it on overnight or for at least 30 minutes before washing it off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily. 

14. Lemon Juice

Lemon juice is rich in vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant. Lemons also have anti-inflammatory and bactericidal properties (20), (21). All of these help in combating skin rashes and preventing further infections.

You Will Need
  • ½ lemon
  • Cotton pads
What You Have To Do
  1. Squeeze the juice from half a lemon into a small bowl.
  2. Dip a cotton pad into this juice and apply it to the affected areas.
  3. If you have sensitive skin, dilute the lemon juice with an equal amount of water.
  4. Leave it on for 20 to 30 minutes before washing it off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily or every alternate day.

Caution: Do not use this remedy if you have dry or sensitive skin. 

15. Oatmeal

Oatmeal for bath to soothe rashes
Image: Shutterstock

Oatmeal has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can help in treating different skin conditions, like eczema, pruritusi  The scientific term used to describe the itching feeling or sensation that makes you want to scratch the skin. , atopic dermatitis, acneiform eruptionsi  A group of skin disorders characterized by red bumps and pus-filled bumps on the skin, resembling acne. , and viral infections (22), (23). These properties also help in reducing itchiness, dryness, and roughness associated with rashes.

You Will Need

  • 1 cup of oatmeal
  • Water
What You Have To Do
  1. Grind the oatmeal in a blender finely.
  2. Mix the powder into your bathtub.
  3. Soak in this solution for 30 minutes and rinse off with warm water.

How Often You Should Do This

Do this 3 times a week.

16. Garlic

Garlic contains a compound called allicin that possesses excellent anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties (24),(25).

You Will Need

Minced garlic cloves

What You Have To Do
  1. Mince a few garlic cloves.
  2. Apply the minced garlic to the affected areas.
  3. Leave it on for 20 to 30 minutes and wash it off with water.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily.

Caution: Do a patch test before using this remedy, as garlic can burn your skin.

17. Ginger

Ginger contains gingerol, which is a potent analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial compound (26), (27). It can help ease the irritation and inflammation associated with skin rashes.

You Will Need

  • 1-2 inches of ginger
  • 1 cup of hot water
  • Cotton pads
What You Have To Do
  1. Add an inch or two of ginger to a glass of steaming hot water.
  2. Steep for 5 to 10 minutes.
  3. Once the ginger solution cools down, soak a cotton pad in it and apply it to the affected areas.
  4. Wash off after 30 minutes or so.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 1 to 2 times daily. 

18. Grapefruit Seed Extract

The grapefruit seed extract is loaded with bioflavonoids that possess antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties (28). It also aids wound healing (29).

You Will Need

Grapefruit seed extract (as required)

What You Have To Do
  1. Apply a few drops of grapeseed fruit extract directly to the rashes with your finger.
  2. Allow it to be completely absorbed by the skin before washing it off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 1 to 2 times daily. 

19. Jojoba Oil

Jojoba oil is rich in vitamin E and can be quickly absorbed by the skin. It helps in keeping the skin well moisturized and also combats rashes due to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties (30).

You Will Need

Jojoba oil (as required)

What You Have To Do
  1. Apply a few drops of jojoba oil to your skin.
  2. Leave it on overnight and wash off the next morning.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily.

Caution: Do a patch test with jojoba oil before applying it to your rashes. 

20. Onion Juice

The presence of quercetin in onions makes them one of the best remedies for skin rashes. Quercetin has anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties and can help in disinfecting the rash and healing it (31).

You Will Need
  • 1 onion
  • Cotton balls
What You Have To Do
  1. Extract the juice from an onion.
  2. Dip a cotton ball in this and apply it to the affected areas.
  3. If you have sensitive skin, mix olive oil with the onion juice.
  4. Leave it on for 30 minutes and wash off.
  5. Additionally, you can also include onion juice in your diet.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 1 to 2 times daily.

Caution: Some individuals may be allergic to onions. Please do a patch test. 

21. Carrot Juice

Woman drinking fresh carrot juice for healthy skin
Image: Shutterstock

Carrot juice contains high levels of vitamin A, which boosts skin health. Deficiencies in vitamin A can trigger skin allergies (32). Thus, consumption of carrot juice daily can help treat skin problems, like rashes.

You Will Need

1 glass of carrot juice

What You Have To Do

Consume a glass of carrot juice.

How Often You Should Do This

Do this daily.

22. Humidifiers

During winter months or in air-conditioned rooms, dry air may harm the skin barrier function and make it more prone to irritation and damage from allergens (33). It may also worsen existing dermatological conditions. Using a humidifier may help add moisture to the air and calm your skin. You can either buy a store-bought humidifier or prepare one at home using some simple objects.

You Will Need

  • A big piece of sponge
  • A plastic container with a lid
  • Water

What You Have To Do

  1. Cut the sponge so it fits inside the plastic container.
  2. Place it inside the container and pour water over it until it is completely soaked.
  3. Cover the container with the lid, leaving a small gap to allow moisture to escape.

How Often You Should Do This

Do this daily.

protip_icon Quick Tip
You can also apply an over-the-counter 0.5-1% hydrocortisone cream, antifungal cream, or calamine lotions to soothe your rash.

Paying a little more attention to your diet along with following the above remedies can help you treat skin rashes.

Diet For Rashes

Best Foods To Reduce Rashes

Foods that can help in reducing rashes include:

  • Beans
  • Chickpeas
  • Carrots
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Mangoes
  • Vitamin C-rich foods like citrus fruits, spinach, broccoli.
  • Fatty fish

Foods To Avoid

Foods that need to be avoided are:

  • Eggs
  • Milk
  • Peanuts
  • Tree nuts
  • Wheat
  • Soy
  • Shellfish

These foods account for about 90% of all food allergies and are best avoided.

Given below are some additional tips to prevent developing skin rashes.

Prevention Tips

  • Avoid using harsh or irritating soaps.
  • Avoid contact with those who have infectious rashes.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Keep your stress under control.
  • Avoid wearing tight clothes. Instead, wear light and loose-fitting clothes.
  • Maintain personal hygiene.

Dr. Chacon advises, “Without a prescription, hydrocortisone cream (1% concentration) can treat many rashes. A prescription is required to purchase stronger cortisone creams. Apply moisturizers to eczema-affected skin. To treat eczema or psoriasis symptoms, use oatmeal bath products, which are sold in pharmacies.”

protip_icon Quick Tip
Opt for unscented moisturizers and other skin care products to avoid ingredients that may aggravate your skin. Look for products that are marked “unscented” or fragrance-free.”

Let’s now look at the type of skin rashes and their signs and symptoms. 

Types Of Skin Rashes

Any abnormal change in the color or texture of your skin often indicates a skin rash. Rashes are mainly classified into two types – noninfectious and infectious rashes.

Non-infectious rashes include eczema, contact dermatitis, psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitisi  A common chronic skin condition that affects the oily areas of the body, causing dandruff, scaly patches, and inflamed skin. , rosaceai  A chronic inflammatory skin condition that causes red, swollen, and small pus-filled bumps on the skin and facial redness. , hives, xerosis (dry skin), and allergic dermatitis.

Infectious rashes are ringworm, impetigo, scabiesi  An itchy skin rash caused by tiny mites called Sarcoptes scabiei that can burrow into the skin. , herpes, chickenpox, and shingles.

Signs and Symptoms Of Skin Rashes

  • Itchy red skin
  • Bumpy skin, with pus-filled bumps
  • Blisters
  • Scaly, dry skin

These symptoms could surface individually or in combination, depending on the cause of your rash.

Infographic: Top Natural Ways To Get Rid Of Skin Rashes

You have certainly had a rash at some point in your life but do you know how to get rid of it? It depends on factors like the kind of rash and how quickly the swelling can be controlled. While some might disappear, others might stick around for a while. We have rounded up a few natural remedies that can quickly get rid of these rashes in the infographic below!

top natural ways to get rid of skin rashes (infographic)

Illustration: StyleCraze Design Team

Rashes on the face are quite commonplace and may either be infectious or non-infectious. Some causes of rashes include allergies, autoimmune conditions, reactions to certain medications, parasites, and fungal, viral, or bacterial infections. Regardless of the cause, rashes can be uncomfortable and difficult to deal with, especially when they appear on the face. Home remedies to get rid of rashes on the face include the use of essential oils and natural oils, breast milk, aloe vera, baking soda, onion juice, oatmeal, carrot juice, manuka honey, petroleum jelly, and green tea, to name a few. If the rashes persist, consult your healthcare provider so that the underlying cause can be diagnosed and treated. Now you know all about face rash remedies. Hope you have an itch-free life, and don’t miss out on sun protection for extra care!

Frequently Asked Questions

How long do skin rashes take to heal?

Skin rashes can take anywhere between 2 to 4 weeks to disappear completely. However, treatment can speed up your recovery.

Can stress cause a rash on my face?

Yes, stress can lead to red and raised rashes called hives on different parts of the body, such as the neck, face, hands, and chest. Stress can also aggravate existing skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis (34).

How to get rid of a rash overnight?

It is not possible to get rid of a rash overnight. However, if the rash is caused by a medical condition or allergic reaction, medication might help fix it quicker than home remedies.

Is it safe to use makeup or skincare products when you have a facial rash?

No, it is generally not recommended to use makeup or skincare products when you have a facial rash, as they may aggravate the condition.

How does age affect the development and treatment of facial rashes?

Certain types of rashes are more common in infants and young children while others affect middle-aged or older adults. The skin’s ability to repair itself and fight infection may also decrease with age, making it harder to treat certain rashes. That is why treatment should be adjusted based on age and overall health to ensure it is effective and safe.

Can environmental factors like pollution or weather cause facial rashes?

Yes, pollution and weather can irritate the skin and cause inflammation, which can result in a rash. Extreme heat, cold, or wind can also cause dryness or irritation, increasing the risk of developing rashes.

Is it possible to get rid of facial rashes permanently?

This depends on the underlying cause of the rash. Some people may have long periods of remission from particular types of rashes, while others may have periodic flare-ups.

Key Takeaways

  • Some home remedies to reduce rashes on the face are aloe vera, honey, oatmeal, cucumber, and tea tree oil.
  • Cucumber has a soothing effect and may decrease swelling and tenderness.
  • Tea tree oil possesses antimicrobial properties that may combat fungal and bacterial skin infections, which can cause rashes.
  • Steer clear of strong chemicals and topical creams as they might make the skin worse.
  • Drinking plenty of water helps to maintain skin hydration and prevents triggering factors that may cause skin irritation.
get rid of rashes on the face

Image: Stable Diffusion/StyleCraze Design Team


Looking for valuable insights on effectively managing a face rash? Check out the following video to discover practical tips and techniques to minimize redness and irritation and take care of face rashes.

Personal Experience: Source

References

Articles on StyleCraze are backed by verified information from peer-reviewed and academic research papers, reputed organizations, research institutions, and medical associations to ensure accuracy and relevance. Read our editorial policy to learn more.

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Dr. Jyoti Gupta is a board-certified (IADVL) dermatologist specializing in cosmetic, laser, and hair transplant surgery. She has 10 years of experience, and has done over 1000 hair transplant surgeries and 3000 aesthetic procedures
Read full bio of Dr. Jyoti Gupta