21 Home Remedies To Get Rid Of Rashes On The Face + Diet And Prevention Tips

Medically reviewed by Dr. Jyoti Gupta, Dermatologist
by Pooja Karkala

We have all had rashes at some point in our lives. They not only cause itching and pain but also put you through a lot of discomfort. While a few go away on their own, others take time. Skin rashes could also be a result of a more serious underlying skin condition – another reason to steer clear of them. Are there any natural remedies for rashes? Keep reading to find out.

What Causes Skin Rashes?

The causes of non-infectious rashes are:

  • Allergies
  • Reactions to medicinal drugs
  • Dry skin
  • Hypersensitivity to plants like poison ivy
  • Autoimmune conditions
  • Food allergies

The causes of infectious rashes include:

  • Fungal infections caused by Trichophyton, Candida, etc.
  • Viral infections like herpes simplex, herpes zoster, HIV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)
  • Infections caused by bacteria like Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Pseudomonas, etc.
  • Parasites like lice and mites

Rashes can be quite troublesome in the long run. You can follow the remedies discussed below to soothe them and accelerate healing.

Note: The remedies discussed below may help ease the symptoms of a rash. However, if the rash persists for more than a week, consult your healthcare provider to test for any underlying causes.

Home Remedies For Skin Rashes

  1. Essential Oils
  2. Apple Cider Vinegar
  3. Coconut Oil
  4. Baking Soda
  5. Aloe Vera
  6. Epsom Salt
  7. Petroleum Jelly
  8. Castor Oil
  9. Breast Milk
  10. Hydrogen Peroxide
  11. Manuka Honey
  12. Green Tea
  13. Neem Oil
  14. Lemon Juice
  15. Oatmeal
  16. Garlic
  17. Ginger
  18. Grapefruit Seed Extract
  19. Jojoba Oil
  20. Onion Juice
  21. Carrot Juice

1. Essential Oils

a. Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help reduce the inflammation and redness associated with rashes. It is also antiseptic and antimicrobial, which helps prevent further infections (1). 

You Will Need
  • 12 drops of tea tree oil
  • 30 mL of any carrier oil (coconut or jojoba oil)
What You Have To Do
  1. Add 12 drops of tea tree oil to 30 mL of any carrier oil.
  2. Apply this mixture to the affected areas.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this at least once daily, preferably before going to bed.

b. Lavender Oil

Lavender oil has anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties (2). It can help soothe and reduce the swelling, pain, and inflammation associated with skin rashes.

You Will Need
  • 12 drops of lavender oil
  • 30 mL of coconut or olive oil
What You Have To Do
  1. Mix 12 drops of lavender oil with 30 ml of coconut oil.
  2. Apply this mixture to the affected areas.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this at least once daily.

c. Eucalyptus Oil

One of the major constituents of eucalyptus oil is eucalyptol. This compound has cooling, soothing, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties that can accelerate healing (3).

You Will Need
  • 12 drops of eucalyptus oil
  • 30 mL of any carrier (coconut or jojoba oil)
What You Have To Do
  1. Add 12 drops of eucalyptus oil to 30 mL of any carrier oil.
  2. Mix well and apply to the rashes.
  3. Leave it on overnight.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily.

2. Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties (4). This may help treat skin rashes and ease the symptoms. However, more scientific studies are needed to prove this effect.

You Will Need
  • 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar
  • ½ cup of water
  • Cotton pads
What You Have To Do
  1. Add a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar to half a cup of water.
  2. Soak a cotton pad in this mixture and apply it to the rashes.
  3. Allow the mixture to be absorbed completely.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 2 times daily. 

3. Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is proven to exhibit strong anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antimicrobial activities (5), (6). These activities can soothe the existing rashes and prevent their recurrence.

You Will Need

Coconut oil (as required)

What You Have To Do
  1. Take a little coconut oil in your palm and apply it gently to the affected areas.
  2. Leave it on for 30 to 60 minutes before washing it off.
  3. You can also leave it on overnight.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily. 

4. Baking Soda

Baking soda neutralizes the pH of your skin. It also has an antipruritic effect on rashes (7). However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to prove the effect of baking soda in treating skin rashes.

You Will Need
  • 1 teaspoon of baking soda
  • Water (as required)
What You Have To Do
  1. Mix the baking soda with water to make a thick paste.
  2. Apply this mixture to the rashes and allow it to dry.
  3. Wash the baking soda mixture off your skin with plain water.

Caution: Do a patch test before using baking soda on your skin.

How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily. 

5. Aloe Vera

Aloe vera gel is highly recommended for skin rashes due to its healing and anti-inflammatory properties (8). This gel is also antimicrobial, which helps prevent the recurrence of the infection.

You Will Need

Aloe gel (as required)

What You Have To Do
  1. Scrape a little fresh aloe gel from the aloe plant.
  2. Apply it directly to the rashes on your face and skin.
  3. Leave it on for at least 30 minutes before washing off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 1 to 2 times daily.

6. Epsom Salt

Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) has anti-inflammatory properties (9). Hence, it can be used for treating the inflammation, swelling, and itchiness associated with skin rashes.

You Will Need
  • 1 cup of Epsom salt
  • Water
What You Have To Do
  1. Add a cup of Epsom salt to a tub of water.
  2. Soak in the Epsom salt bath for 20 to 30 minutes.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily or every alternate day.

7. Petroleum Jelly

Petroleum jelly forms a protective layer on your skin and prevents microbial infections while keeping your skin well moisturized. In one study, Vaseline, along with other antibiotics and antihistamines, was shown to improve facial rash in one week of continued use (10).

You Will Need

Petroleum jelly (as required)

What You Have To Do
  1. Apply a little petroleum jelly gently to the affected area.
  2. Leave it on and reapply as and when required.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this multiple times daily, as per your requirement.

Note: Petroleum jelly can also be used to treat diaper rashes in babies.

8. Castor Oil

The presence of ricinoleic acid in castor oil gives it anti-inflammatory properties that can help reduce inflammation, swelling, and itchiness (11). It is commonly used to treat many skin disorders (12).

You Will Need

2 teaspoons of castor oil

What You Have To Do
  1. Apply a little castor oil to the affected areas.
  2. Leave it on for at least 30 minutes before washing it off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily.

Caution: Do a patch test before following this remedy as some individuals could be sensitive to castor oil. 

9. Breast Milk

Breast milk moisturizes your baby’s skin and protects it from further infections. It can also help treat other skin problems (13).

You Will Need

A few drops of breast milk

What You Have To Do
  1. Apply a few drops of breast milk to the rashes on your baby’s skin.
  2. Allow it to dry and reapply as required.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 1 to 2 times daily.

10. Hydrogen Peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide has antibacterial properties (14). Hence, it may help in treating infectious rashes and prevent further infections. However, there is insufficient evidence to prove this effect.

You Will Need
  • 3% hydrogen peroxide
  • Cotton balls
What You Have To Do
  1. Dip a cotton ball in hydrogen peroxide and apply it directly to the rashes.
  2. Allow it to dry and wash it off with water.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 1 to 2 times daily.

Caution: Do not try this remedy if you have sensitive skin.

11. Manuka Honey

Manuka honey is quite popular for its powerful anti-inflammatory and healing properties, and it helps reduce the swelling and inflammation (15).

You Will Need

  • 1 tablespoon of manuka honey
  • 2 teaspoons of olive oil
What You Have To Do
  1. Mix a tablespoon of manuka honey with two teaspoons of olive oil.
  2. Apply the mixture to the affected areas.
  3. Leave it on for 30 to 60 minutes before washing it off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this at least once daily.

12. Green Tea

Green tea contains beneficial polyphenols that protect your skin from free radical damage due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties (16),(17). This helps soothe the rash and prevent its recurrence.

You Will Need
  • 1 teaspoon of green tea
  • 1 cup of hot water
  • Cotton pads
What You Have To Do
  1. Add a teaspoon of green tea to a cup of hot water.
  2. Allow it to steep for 5 to 10 minutes.
  3. Keep it aside to cool.
  4. Dip a cotton pad into the tea and apply it to the affected areas.
  5. Leave it on for at least 30 minutes before washing it off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily. 

13. Neem Oil

Neem oil exhibits anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and antihistamine activities, which treat skin rashes and their symptoms like inflammation and redness (18), (19).

You Will Need

A few drops of neem oil

What You Have To Do
  1. Apply neem oil directly to the rashes on your body and face.
  2. Leave it on overnight or for at least 30 minutes before washing it off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily. 

14. Lemon Juice

Lemon juice is rich in vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant. Lemons also have anti-inflammatory and bactericidal properties (20), (21). All of these help in combating skin rashes and preventing further infections.

You Will Need
  • ½ lemon
  • Cotton pads
What You Have To Do
  1. Squeeze the juice from half a lemon into a small bowl.
  2. Dip a cotton pad into this juice and apply it to the affected areas.
  3. If you have sensitive skin, dilute the lemon juice with an equal amount of water.
  4. Leave it on for 20 to 30 minutes before washing it off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily or every alternate day.

Caution: Do not use this remedy if you have dry or sensitive skin. 

15. Oatmeal

Oatmeal has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can help in treating different skin conditions, like eczema, pruritus, atopic dermatitis, acneiform eruptions, and viral infections (22), (23). These properties also help in reducing itchiness, dryness, and roughness associated with rashes.

You Will Need

  • 1 cup of oatmeal
  • Water
What You Have To Do
  1. Grind the oatmeal in a blender finely.
  2. Mix the powder into your bathtub.
  3. Soak in this solution for 30 minutes and rinse off with warm water. 

How Often You Should Do This

Do this 3 times a week.

16. Garlic

Garlic contains a compound called allicin that possesses excellent anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties (24),(25).

You Will Need

Minced garlic cloves

What You Have To Do
  1. Mince a few garlic cloves.
  2. Apply the minced garlic to the affected areas.
  3. Leave it on for 20 to 30 minutes and wash it off with water.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily.

Caution: Do a patch test before using this remedy, as garlic can burn your skin.

17. Ginger

Ginger contains gingerol, which is a potent analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial compound (26), (27). It can help ease the irritation and inflammation associated with skin rashes.

You Will Need

  • 1-2 inches of ginger
  • 1 cup of hot water
  • Cotton pads
What You Have To Do
  1. Add an inch or two of ginger to a glass of steaming hot water.
  2. Steep for 5 to 10 minutes.
  3. Once the ginger solution cools down, soak a cotton pad in it and apply it to the affected areas.
  4. Wash off after 30 minutes or so.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 1 to 2 times daily. 

18. Grapefruit Seed Extract

The grapefruit seed extract is loaded with bioflavonoids that possess antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties (28). It also aids wound healing (29).

You Will Need

Grapefruit seed extract (as required)

What You Have To Do
  1. Apply a few drops of grapeseed fruit extract directly to the rashes with your finger.
  2. Allow it to be completely absorbed by the skin before washing it off.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 1 to 2 times daily. 

19. Jojoba Oil

Jojoba oil is rich in vitamin E and can be quickly absorbed by the skin. It helps in keeping the skin well moisturized and also combats rashes due to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties (30).

You Will Need

Jojoba oil (as required)

What You Have To Do
  1. Apply a few drops of jojoba oil to your skin.
  2. Leave it on overnight and wash off the next morning.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this once daily.

Caution: Do a patch test with jojoba oil before applying it to your rashes. 

20. Onion Juice

The presence of quercetin in onions makes them one of the best remedies for skin rashes. Quercetin has anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties and can help in disinfecting the rash and healing it (31).

You Will Need
  • 1 onion
  • Cotton balls
What You Have To Do
  1. Extract the juice from an onion.
  2. Dip a cotton ball in this and apply it to the affected areas.
  3. If you have sensitive skin, mix olive oil with the onion juice.
  4. Leave it on for 30 minutes and wash off.
  5. Additionally, you can also include onion juice in your diet.
How Often You Should Do This

Do this 1 to 2 times daily.

Caution: Some individuals may be allergic to onions. Please do a patch test. 

21. Carrot Juice

Carrot juice contains high levels of vitamin A, which boosts skin health. Deficiencies in vitamin A can trigger skin allergies (32). Thus, consumption of carrot juice daily can help treat skin problems, like rashes.

You Will Need

1 glass of carrot juice

What You Have To Do

Consume a glass of carrot juice.

How Often You Should Do This

Do this daily.

Paying a little more attention to your diet along with following the above remedies can help you treat skin rashes.

Diet For Rashes

Best Foods To Reduce Rashes

Foods that can help in reducing rashes include:

  • Beans
  • Chickpeas
  • Carrots
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Mangoes
  • Vitamin C-rich foods like citrus fruits, spinach, broccoli.
  • Fatty fish

Foods To Avoid

Foods that need to be avoided are:

  • Eggs
  • Milk
  • Peanuts
  • Tree nuts
  • Wheat
  • Soy
  • Shellfish

These foods account for about 90% of all food allergies and are best avoided.

Given below are some additional tips to prevent developing skin rashes.

Prevention Tips

  • Avoid using harsh or irritating soaps.
  • Avoid contact with those who have infectious rashes.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Keep your stress under control.
  • Avoid wearing tight clothes. Instead, wear light and loose-fitting clothes.
  • Maintain personal hygiene.

Let’s now look at the type of skin rashes and their signs and symptoms. 

Types Of Skin Rashes

Any abnormal change in the color or texture of your skin often indicates a skin rash. Rashes are mainly classified into two types – non-infectious and infectious rashes.

Non-infectious rashes include eczema, contact dermatitis, psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, rosacea, hives, xerosis (dry skin), and allergic dermatitis.

Infectious rashes are ringworm, impetigo, scabies, herpes, chickenpox, and shingles.

Signs and Symptoms Of Skin Rashes

  • Itchy red skin
  • Bumpy skin, with pus-filled bumps
  • Blisters
  • Scaly, dry skin

These symptoms could surface individually or in combination, depending on the cause of your rash.

Rashes are quite common, and most of them can be treated with the help of the simple home remedies and tips mentioned in this article. However, if you find no improvement in your condition, consult your doctor immediately.

Expert’s Answers For Readers’ Questions

How long do skin rashes take to heal?

Skin rashes can take anywhere between 2 to 4 weeks to disappear completely. However, treatment can speed up your recovery.

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Pooja Karkala

Pooja is a Mass Communications and Psychology graduate. Her education has helped her develop the perfect balance between what the reader wants to know and what the reader has to know. As a classical dancer, she has long, black hair, and she knows the struggle that goes into maintaining it. She believes in home remedies and grandma’s secrets for achieving beautiful, luscious hair. When she is not writing, she learns Kuchipudi, practices yoga, and creates doodles.
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