Is Orange Juice Good For Constipation?

Learn how this citrus, pulpy fruit juice may support your bowel movement.

Medically reviewed by Sarah Spann, Adv Dip (Nut Med), mATMS Sarah Spann Sarah SpannAdv Dip (Nut Med), mATMS facebook_iconinsta_icon
Written by , MS (Biotechnology) Kushneet Kukreja MS (Biotechnology) Experience: 2 years
Edited by , BA (Literature & Psychology), PG Diploma Arshiya Syeda BA (Literature & Psychology), PG Diploma Experience: 7 years
Fact-checked by , MA (English) Dipti Sharma MA (English) Experience: 2 years
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Orange juice for constipation works, as strange as it may seem! It’s one of those easy, quick fixes that you can try out as soon as you get concerned over the reduced frequency of your bowel movements. Generally, less than thrice a week is considered low frequency for passing stool. Even without counting the days, you may be able to tell if you are constipated if you feel bloated and have to strain to clear your bowels. While constipation can present as just an annoyance in the short run, it can lead to various health complications in the long run. Therefore it is best tackled as early as possible, and orange juice can help.
Read on to find out how!

Is Orange Juice Good For Constipation?

Woman relieving constipation by drinking orange juice
Image: Shutterstock

How does orange juice help relieve constipation? Both insoluble and soluble fibers (pectins) are present in orange juice, which, as you know, plays an important role in facilitating bowel movement (1). When you do not get enough fiber in your diet, it wreaks havoc with your digestive system. Drinking orange juice with the pulp gives you the fiber you need and stimulates your bowels, helping you to go to the bathroom without any problems.

But does orange juice make you poop? Yes, Orange juice also stimulates bowel movements by enhancing the peristaltic activityi  Muscle contractions that cause the movement of food through the digestive system, initiated by the parasympathetic nervous system. , which pushes the food through the colon and causes it to be eliminated from the body (2). Here is how you can combine orange juice with various ingredients from your pantry and multiply its beneficial effects.


protip_icon Quick Tip
Orange juice can be consumed one to two hours after breakfast when you are neither too empty nor too full to treat constipation.

How To Use Orange Juice For Constipation

Woman making fresh orange juice with her little daughter
Image: Shutterstock
  1. Olive Oil And Orange Juice
  2. Prune Juice And Orange Juice
  3. Orange Juice And Aloe Vera

Orange Juice Remedies For Constipation

1. Olive Oil And Orange Juice For Constipation

Olive oil and orange juice for constipation
Image: IStock

You Will Need

  • 1 glass orange juice (with pulp)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

What You Have To Do

  1. Mix the olive oil with orange juice.
  2. Drink this.

Castor oil, flaxseed oil or mineral oil can also be used instead of olive oil to achieve the same result.

How Often You Should Do This

Use this natural remedy as and when required.

Why This Works

Olive oil is another great home remedy for constipation. Its consistency and texture make it very effective in treating this problem. It also helps in stimulating the digestive system, which in turn helps in moving things through the colon. When you take it regularly, it can prevent constipation from affecting you in the future as well (3).

2. Prune Juice And Orange Juice For Constipation

Prune and orange juice for constipation
Image: IStock

You Will Need

  • ½ cup prune juice
  • ½ cup orange juice (with pulp)

What You Have To Do

Combine the two juices together and drink it.

How Often You Should Do This

If required, drink this juice combination again after a few hours.

Why This Works

Prunes and their juice are commonly used to treat constipation. They are rich in fiber, folate, and sorbitoli  A type of carbohydrate that is used in food to add sweetness, preserve moisture, and support digestive health. which softens the stool and helps it to pass out of the body easily (4).

3. Orange Juice And Aloe Vera For Constipation

Orange juice and aloe vera for constipation
Image: IStock

You Will Need

  • 2 tablespoons aloe vera gel
  • 1 cup orange juice

What You Have To Do

  1. Extract fresh aloe gel from the plant’s leaf.
  2. Mix this with the orange juice and drink it.

How Often You Should Do This

Repeat this after 4-5 hours if there is still no relief.

Why This Works

Aloe vera was shown to improve the water holding capacity of stool (5). As this increases, stool passage and elimination become easy for the body. The aloe gel also lines the intestines and smoothens the elimination process.

protip_icon Quick Tip
Excessive consumption of orange juice can lead to diarrhea, headache, vomiting, and insomnia.

While orange juice may help ease bowel movements, it may also lead to digestive complications. Check them out in the next section.

Side Effects Of Orange Juice

Orange juice may aggravate constipation in the following ways:

  • Drinking orange juice between meals may raise blood sugar levels due to its high sweet content (6). This may impact colon functioning, which may increase the risk of constipation, bloating, and abdominal pain (7).
  • Orange juice is rich in fructose, which may not be properly metabolized by people with digestive issues. This can worsen the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) such as abdominal pain, constipation, and bloating (9).

When you look at natural remedies for constipation, chances are that you will find oranges among the list. According to experts, eating one or two oranges every night before you go to bed and in the morning can also help prevent constipation. Make oranges and/or orange juice a part of your daily diet in order to keep your digestive system functioning optimally.

Infographic: 3 Orange Juice Remedies For Constipation

Orange juice is rich in fiber and stimulates your bowel movements to make stool passage easy. Low fiber content in your food can cause constipation, which can be easily relieved with home remedies that contain orange juice pulp and other natural ingredients. Check out the infographic below to learn how they ease discomfort and promote gut health.

3 orange juice remedies for constipation (infographic)

Illustration: StyleCraze Design Team

It’s very healthy to consume orange juice for constipation relief as it is rich in dietary fiber. It is also a great source of hydration. It is also loaded with beneficial bioactive compounds, flavonoids, phytochemicals, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals that promote good health. This beverage when coupled with other natural ingredients like olive oil, aloe vera gel, and prune juice can effectively improve your bowel movements. These home remedies boost  your digestion and may soften your stool, which will help relieve constipation. This nutrition-rich drink contains vitamin A, potassium, magnesium, trace amounts of vitamin B6 (niacin), iron, zinc, copper, manganese, calcium, selenium, phosphorus, etc. It also contains various carotenoids, including beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, gamma-carotene, delta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and lutein, which help promote overall health and wellness.

Orange juice is rich in vitamin C and natural sugars. Vitamin C has been shown to fight depression and improve mood (9). The natural sugars in the juice can also increase dopaminei  A type of neurotransmitter created by the nervous system, that communicates between nerve cells. levels in the brain, making you feel good (10). In addition, the color orange, according to color psychologists, may help improve one’s focus and energy.

Key Takeaways

  • Drinking orange juice with pulp improves bowel movement as it is high in fiber and stimulates peristaltic activity.
  • Make a drink with olive oil and orange juice to manage constipation.
  • A mix of prune juice and orange juice has high fiber content that improves bowel movement.
  • Drinking orange juice mixed with fresh aloe vera gel increases the water capacity of stools, making it easy to pass.
orange juice for constipation

Image: Stable Diffusion/StyleCraze Design Team


Explore the health benefits of orange juice for constipation relief in this insightful video. Learn how this natural remedy can aid digestion and promote bowel regularity.

Frequently Asked Questions

What drinks make constipation worse?

As per a study on patients with constipation, drinks such as black tea can cause constipation (11). Drinks such as carbonated beverages and alcohol that dehydrate the body may also worsen symptoms of constipation (12).

How long does it take for orange juice to relieve constipation?

Anecdotal evidence suggests that orange juice can relieve constipation within a few hours of its consumption. It may be possible due to the presence of a significant amount of dietary fiber in it (13).

Can children drink orange juice for constipation?

Yes, children can drink orange juice for constipation since it contains 5% of the daily recommended dietary fiber (13). Additionally, orange juice helps increase height in children (14).

Is it better to drink freshly squeezed orange juice or store-bought orange juice for constipation relief?

It is better to consume freshly squeezed orange juice as it contains less sodium and sucrose than store-bought orange juice (15). Fresh fruit juices are also rich in essential nutrients, such as potassium and phosphorus and contain no preservatives.

Can drinking orange juice be used as a long-term solution for chronic constipation?

Yes, orange juice can be used as a long-term solution as it is rich in fiber and can help with chronic constipation. However, for an effective solution, you also need to incorporate healthy lifestyle changes, such as regular exercise, adequate fluid intake, and a balanced diet.

References

Articles on StyleCraze are backed by verified information from peer-reviewed and academic research papers, reputed organizations, research institutions, and medical associations to ensure accuracy and relevance. Read our editorial policy to learn more.

  1. High-Fiber Orange Juice as a Nutrition Supplement in Women: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study of Tolerance and Effectiveness
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24941951/
  2. Food is your Medicine
    https://books.google.co.in/books?id=jxQHBAAAQBAJ&pg=PA63&dq=orange+juice+increases+peristaltic+activity&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi53uDDz-PUAhXEQo8KHeLnB4sQ6AEIITAA#v=onepage&q=orange%20juice%20increases%20peristaltic%20activity&f=false
  3. The short-term effects of olive oil and flaxseed oil for the treatment of constipation in hemodialysis patients
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25238699/
  4. Dried plums and their products: composition and health effects–an updated review
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24090144/
  5. Effects of orally consumed aloe vera
    https://www.desertharvest.com/physicians/documents/DH127.pdf
  6. High orange juice consumption with or in-between three meals a day differently affects energy balance in healthy subjects
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5916905/
  7. Diabetes mellitus and the colon
    https://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6049816/
  8. Is fructose malabsorption a cause of irritable bowel syndrome?
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4729202/
  9. High Vitamin C Status Is Associated with Elevated Mood in Male Tertiary Students
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6071228/
  10. Chronic Consumption of Fructose Induces Behavioral Alterations by Increasing Orexin and Dopamine Levels in the Rat Brain
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30423806/
  11. The perceived effect of various foods and beverages on stool consistency
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15647650/
  12. Mild dehydration: a risk factor of constipation?
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/14681719/
  13. [Orange juice nutritional profile]
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30592860/
  14. Orange juice intake and anthropometric changes in children and adolescents
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33023713/
  15. Comparison of the nutrient content of fresh fruit juices vs commercial fruit juices
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12403253/
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Sarah Spann

Sarah SpannAdv Dip (Nut Med), mATMS

Sarah Spann has 4 years of experience as a clinical nutritionist. She specializes in gut health and is based in Brisbane, Australia. She is dedicated to changing the paradigm of gut health and works with clients all over the world to help them get back the freedom, energy and confidence that their gut issues have taken away. Sarah is passionate...read full bio

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