15 Home Remedies For Loss Of Taste And Smell + Prevention

There may be multiple reasons behind a sudden loss of gustatory and olfactory senses.

Medically reviewed by Vd. Naveen Sharma, BAMS
Written by Shaheen Naser, MSc
Edited by Arshiya Syeda, BA (Literature & Psychology), PG Dip
Fact-checked by Dipti Sharma, MA (English)  • 

If you have got a cold or a cough, there is a possibility that you may also experience a loss of taste and smell. Based on the severity of your condition, it could be a partial or complete loss. Smell and taste loss is also a typical problem among the elderly healing from illnesses like cancer.

A variety of medical problems can cause a loss of taste and smell. This article will look at what causes it, what alternative treatments you have, and how natural treatments can help you control the symptoms. Continue reading.

How Do Smell And Taste Work?

Your senses of smell and taste are often connected. However, as you age, these senses can change, and you may experience a change or even loss of smell and taste (1).

The senses of smell and taste are a part of the chemosensory system. The ability to smell things around you comes from special sensory cells called the olfactory sensory neurons. These are found within the olfactory bulb inside the nose.

Each of these olfactory neurons has an odor receptor that is stimulated by microscopic molecules released by the substances around us. Smells reach the olfactory receptors via two pathways. The first is through the nostrils, and the second is via a channel that connects the roof of the throat to the nose. The aroma from food releases aromas through the second channel.

The ability to taste is also referred to as gustatory perception. The tongue has about 2,000 to 5,000 chemical receptors on its surface. These are also more commonly called taste buds.

The five major tastes that are perceived by your taste buds are sweet, sour, bitter, salty, and umami. You can perceive taste when water-soluble chemicals in your mouth come in contact with your taste buds (2).

The brain receives signals from the tongue and processes them into distinct tastes. The sense of taste can also be linked to other senses, like the sense of smell and brain functions.

protip_icon Trivia
In evolutionary terms, the sense of smell is one of the oldest senses, enabling organisms with receptors for odorants to identify food, potential mates, and dangers.

Taste and smell impairment can also be referred to as chemosensory dysfunction. In the next section, we will discuss some major factors that may cause a loss of taste and smell.

What Causes The Loss Of Taste And Smell?

As we have already mentioned, your sense of smell and taste are correlated. In fact, when you sense a loss in taste, it could actually be a result of impairment in the sense of smell.

Conditions like hyposmia, anosmiai  XA temporary or even permanent loss of smell caused due to smoking, medicinal side effects, nasal obstruction, or mucus. , parosmia, and phantosmiai  X Also known as olfactory hallucination, a condition in which you detect smells that are not present in the environment. can cause impairment in perceiving smells. Similarly, some common taste disorders are ageusiai  XA rare condition characterized by a loss of taste caused due to infections, certain medications, or nutritional deficiencies. , hypogeusia, dysgeusia, parageusiai  XA bad or metallic taste in the mouth caused due to medication, treatment, or a medical condition. , and hypergeusiai  XA taste disorder in which the sense of taste is abnormally heightened due to lesions in a small space located in the skull. (3).

Barney Stringer, a blogger, shared his life-long experience with anosmia. He writes, “For something so little understood, anosmia is surprisingly common, either temporary or permanent – it can be caused by obstruction (polyps), injury, or just old age (i).” The blogger also shares how the condition can bring danger as well, from not being able to detect smoke to consuming expired food.

Both taste and smell disorders are often the results of similar conditions or factors. Loss of smell and taste can be triggered by sinus, respiratory conditions, aging, head trauma, dental issues like oral infection, placement of dental appliances (like dentures), and Bell’s palsy (4).

A study conducted on 10,953 individuals found that 3,356 were COVID positive and 602 were COVID-negative. Out of the COVID-positive participants, 21% of the participants reported a reduction in taste, 47% of them reported a reduction in smell, and 17% of them had oral irritation.

If your senses of smell and taste seem to have been impaired, it is best to get diagnosed to determine the underlying cause of your condition.

Diagnosis Of Loss Of Taste And Smell

Both smell and taste alteration conditions are often diagnosed by an ENT specialist or otolaryngologist. Your doctor may test for the lowest concentration of taste that you can sense and odor you can smell. You may be asked to taste different substances of varying concentrations for the same.

You may also be asked to take a simple ‘sip, spit, and rinse’ test. Your doctor might conduct a physical examination of your ears, nose, or throat.

Once your condition is diagnosed accurately, the doctor will suggest the appropriate mode of treatment.

Medical Treatment Options

The method of treatment depends on the severity of symptoms, age, and general health. The treatment options may include:

  • If some medication is causing this condition, you will be asked to discontinue or stop taking it.
  • Zinc deficiency can hamper your sense of taste and smell (5). Zinc can help stimulate food intake by triggering the hypothalamusi  XA structure deep inside the brain that controls appetite and plays a role in palate and taste perception. to enhance the sense of taste.
  • Quitting smoking can help regain a sense of taste over time.

protip_icon Quick Tip
Other treatments for taste and smell impairment include addressing the underlying health issue and surgical intervention to remove any obstruction that is causing the disorder.

If you are looking for natural alternatives to your problem, the home remedies listed below might help.

Home Remedies For Loss Of Taste And Smell

1. Castor Oil

Castor oil as a remedy for loss of taste and smell
Image: Shutterstock

The ricinoleic acid in castor oil imparts powerful anti-inflammatory properties to it (6). Using castor oil as nasal drops can help alleviate symptoms of swelling and inflammation associated with a cold or flu, thereby restoring your sense of smell and taste.

You Will Need

1 teaspoon of warmed cold-pressed castor oil

What You Have To Do

Put a drop of warmed castor oil into each of your nostrils.

How Often You Should Do This

Do this twice daily – once in the morning, and once in the evening.

2. Garlic

Garlic compounds have antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities (7). This can help treat a stuffy nose, relieving cold and flu-like symptoms. This, in turn, may help you breathe easier and restore your sense of smell and taste.

You Will Need

  • 2-3 chopped garlic cloves
  • 1 cup of water

What You Have To Do

  1. Bring a cup of water to a boil in a saucepan.
  2. Add the chopped garlic cloves and simmer for a few minutes.
  3. Strain and drink the tea.

How Often You Should Do This

You can drink this twice daily.

3. Ginger

Ginger as a remedy for loss of taste and smell
Image: Shutterstock

The warming properties of ginger can help treat cold (8). The strong aroma of ginger enhances your sense of smell, while its flavor stimulates your taste by activating your taste buds.

You Will Need

Small bits of peeled ginger

What You Have To Do

  1. Chew small bits of peeled ginger at regular intervals.
  2. Alternatively, you can consume ginger tea.

How Often You Should Do This

Do this daily.

Note: If you consume ginger in large quantities, it may cause heartburn, throat irritation, and, in some cases, diarrhea.

4. Cayenne Pepper

Cayenne pepper contains capsaicin that is known to clear nasal congestion (9), (10). This, in turn, can help restore your lost sense of taste and smell.

You Will Need
  • 1 teaspoon of cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon of honey
  • 1 cup of warm water

What You Have To Do

  1. Mix a teaspoon each of honey and cayenne pepper powder in a glass of water.
  2. Drink the concoction.

How Often You Should Do This

You can drink this at least once daily.

Note: Cayenne pepper can cause stomach ache if taken in large quantities. If you are taking medication for high blood pressure, you might have to consult your physician before using this remedy.

5. Lemon

Lemon as a remedy for loss of taste and smell
Image: Shutterstock

Lemons are acidic and rich in vitamin C and exhibit antimicrobial activity (11). Its strong, characteristic odor, along with chemical composition, may help reduce infection that causes blocked/runny nose and enhance your sense of taste and smell.

You Will Need
  • ½ lemon
  • 1 glass of water
  • Honey (as required)

What You Have To Do

  1. Add the juice of half a lemon to a glass of water.
  2. Add some honey to it and mix well.
  3. Drink the juice immediately.

How Often You Should Do This

Drink this twice daily, preferably before meals.

Note: Do not use this remedy if you have a throat infection as it may aggravate it.

6. Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar exhibits antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties (12), (13). This may help fight off the microbes that cause infections and clear nasal congestion, thereby enhancing the senses of smell and taste.

You Will Need
  • 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar
  • 1 cup of water
  • Honey (as required)

What You Have To Do

  1. Add a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar to a glass of warm water.
  2. Add a little honey as needed.
  3. Mix well and drink the mixture.

How Often You Should Do This

You can drink this once daily.

Note: Consuming unregulated amounts of undiluted ACV can cause tooth enamel erosion, digestive disorders, and increase potassium levels in your body.

7. Oil Pulling

Oil pulling helps promote oral health, thereby helping you get rid of the foul taste in your mouth (14). It may also help manage symptoms of sore throat and refresh the taste in your mouth.

You Will Need

1 tablespoon of coconut or sesame oil

What You Have To Do

  1. Swish coconut or sesame oil in your mouth for 10 to 15 minutes.
  2. Spit it out and brush your teeth.

How Often You Should Do This

You can do this once daily (every morning).

8. Carom Seeds

Carom seeds have anti-inflammatory properties that can help eliminate nasal congestion (15). This can help enhance the perception of smell and taste.

You Will Need

  • 1 tablespoon of carom seeds
  • A small muslin cloth

What You Have To Do

  1. Put a tablespoon of carom seeds in a small piece of muslin cloth.
  2. Tie the cloth and inhale the strong aroma of carom seeds.

How Often You Should Do This

You can do this multiple times daily.

9. Cinnamon

Cinnamon as a remedy for loss of taste and smell
Image: Shutterstock

Cinnamon possesses anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties (16). This may help reduce any infection that causes nasal congestion, thereby enhancing your sense of smell and taste.

You Will Need

  • ½ teaspoon of cinnamon powder
  • 1 teaspoon of honey

What You Have To Do

  1. Mix half a teaspoon of cinnamon powder with a teaspoon of honey.
  2. Apply this paste to your tongue and leave it on for about 10 minutes.

How Often You Should Do This

Do this twice daily.

Note: Excessive consumption of cinnamon can cause mouth sores. Do not use this remedy more than the stipulated dose.

11. Peppermint

Menthol, the main constituent of peppermint leaves, possesses anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties (17), (18). These can help alleviate symptoms of cold and flu that might be suppressing your sense of smell and taste.

You Will Need

  • 10-15 peppermint leaves
  • 1 cup of water
  • Honey

What You Have To Do

  1. Add 10 to 15 peppermint leaves to a cup of water.
  2. Bring it to a boil in a saucepan.
  3. Simmer and strain.
  4. Once the tea cools down a bit, add some honey to it.
  5. Drink it up.

How Often You Should Do This

You can drink mint tea twice daily.

12. Curry Leaves

Several studies show that curry leaves possess anti-inflammatory properties (19). This may help reduce inflammation associated with cold and flu that may be blocking your nasal passages, thereby restoring the senses of taste and smell.

You Will Need

  • 10-15 curry leaves
  • 1 glass of water

What You Have To Do

  1. Add 10 to 15 curry leaves into a glass of water.
  2. Soak them for about 30 minutes or more.
  3. Drink the mixture.

How Often You Should Do This

Drink this twice daily.

13. Eucalyptus Oil

Eucalpytus oil as a remedy for loss of taste and smell
Image: Shutterstock

Eucalyptus oil contains eucalyptol (1,8-cineole). The anti-inflammatory and mucolytic properties of eucalyptol help relieve symptoms of upper respiratory diseases that could have triggered the smell and taste impairment (20).

You Will Need
  • 1 drop of eucalyptus oil
  • 1 bowl of water
  • A towel

What You Have To Do

  1. Add a drop of eucalyptus oil to a bowl of hot water.
  2. Inhale the steam and cover your head with a towel.
  3. Continue for 10 to 15 minutes.

How Often You Should Do This

You can do this 1 to 2 times daily.

Note: Excessive inhalation of undiluted vapors of eucalyptus oil can cause dizziness, stomach pain, nausea, weakness, etc. Hence, make sure you stick to the amounts specified above.

14. Nasal Irrigation

Nasal saline irrigation is a simple and effective technique used to clean and moisturize nasal passages. It involves flushing out the nasal passages with a saline solution. According to a study, the use of nasal saline irrigation along with corticosteroids (anti-inflammatory medicine) may help improve olfactory dysfunction (21).

You Will Need

  • 1 cup of boiled water
  • ½ teaspoon of non-iodized salt

What You Have To Do

  1. Mix salt and water to prepare the solution.
  2. Turn your head to one side such that one ear is toward the ceiling.
  3. Gently pour the saline solution into the top nostril.
  4. Allow the solution to exit from the bottom nostril.
  5. Turn your head to the opposite side and repeat the process.
  6. Blow your nose to remove excess mucus and remaining solution.

How Often You Should Do This

1 to 2 times daily.

15. Vitamins

Deficiency in vitamin D is associated with loss of smell and taste (22). Vitamins A, B, and E help regulate chemosensory function, but there is very little medical evidence to prove the link of their deficiencies with loss of sense of smell or taste.

Consume foods rich in these vitamins like shellfish, cereals, cheese, and milk to combat the deficiencies. You can also take additional supplements for these nutrients after consulting your doctor.

You must be aware that your diet has a huge role to play in restoring your lost sense of taste and smell. While you are following the above remedies, also remember to alter your eating habits. Follow these diet tips to enhance your sense of smell and taste.

Diet Tips

  • Sources of protein like fish, chicken, or soy may enhance the sense of taste as they are savory (23). You can also have foods like eggs, cheese, and white meats.
  • Consume foods rich in zinc like legumes, nuts, whole grains, shellfish, and dark chocolate. Zinc has been known to stimulate food intake via neuropeptidei  XSmall proteins produced and released by nerve cells in the body that stimulate the intake of food. (23). Therefore, zinc can potentially enhance the sense of taste.

You will have to alter your lifestyle choices to manage your condition. Here are a few tips that can help.

Prevention Tips

  • Drink plenty of water and stay hydrated.
  • Try steam inhalation.
  • Maintain good oral hygiene.
  • Take the necessary precautions to avoid infections like cold and flu – one of the main factors responsible for the loss of taste and smell.

Infographic: Home Remedies For Loss Of Taste And Smell

Loss of smell and taste are uncomfortable symptoms associated with allergies, infections, respiratory conditions, aging, etc. One of the best ways to regain these lost senses is to treat the root cause. There are some simple remedies that you can follow to recover from olfactory dysfunction. Check out the infographic below to know more!

home remedies for loss of taste and smell (infographic)

Illustration: StyleCraze Design Team

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Both loss of taste and smell may be triggered by similar conditions or factors, like sinus, respiratory conditions, oral infections, head trauma, aging, etc. Fortunately, some home remedies can help regain taste and smell by easing nasal congestion during episodes of flu, cold, and respiratory diseases. Thanks to the ingredients, like garlic, castor oil, lemon, apple cider vinegar, cinnamon, etc., which have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. However, loss of smell and taste may be permanent in case of aging, Alzheimer’s, and chemical exposure. So, consult a doctor if the loss of both senses persists to determine if you have any of these underlying conditions.

Frequently Asked Questions

How long does the loss of taste and smell caused by COVID-19 last?

Dr. Jonathan M. Fields, DAOM, says, “The loss of taste and smell caused by COVID-19 can last anywhere from a couple of weeks to over a year, and even permanently in some rare cases. Luckily, it is generally about 2-4 weeks for most people.”

Does Omicron affect taste and smell?

Dr. Fields says, “Omicron and the later variants have dramatically reduced their abilities to inhibit the sense of smell and taste.” However, he feels it is still possible.

Is loss of taste and smell normal with aging?

Yes, it is normal with aging. Dr. Field says, “Some people begin to have a decline in their senses of smell and taste naturally as they age.”

How long does it take for your taste buds to come back?

Usually, taste buds have a cycle that lasts between 10-15 days, and they should come back within this period. However, it may take longer, depending on the cause of your condition.

Can stress affect your sense of taste?

Yes, longer and more severe cases of stress can cause olfactory loss or flavor distortion, which can make you consume more foods than you normally would. It may even cause a weird taste in your mouth and make foods taste foul.

Does the loss of smell affect memory?

Recent research on older people residing outside nursing homes has found that a decline in smell is linked to a quicker accumulation of Alzheimer’s disease-related pathology detected in brain scans. The results prove that loss of smell is a crucial early sign of Alzheimer’s-related cognitive decline and the buildup of linked dangerous proteins (25).

Does low estrogen affect the sense of smell?

Yes. A study has found that since estrogen protects the olfactory function, variations in its levels during specific physiological stages in women – such as pregnancy and postmenopause – can impact a person’s capacity to detect and identify smells (26).

What medications can cause loss of smell and taste?

Some examples of medications that can impair taste and smell include antihypertensive drugs, antihyperlipidemic drugs, antibiotics, neurologic drugs, and endocrine drugs (27).

Does high blood pressure affect taste buds?

Yes. According to a study, people who self-reported having changed taste and smell perception also experienced higher systolic blood pressure and arterial pressure (27).

How to get your taste back instantly?

The time it takes for taste buds to work again depends on the underlying reason for the lack of taste in the first place. However, you can try the above-mentioned remedies a few times to get your taste buds working again.

Key Takeaways

  • Loss of smell and taste may happen due to age, illness, or trauma.
  • Castor oil, ginger, and garlic may help treat loss of taste and smell due to their anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Steam Inhalation may assist in clearing out your nasal passages.
  • Staying hydrated and following good oral hygiene is important.

References

Articles on StyleCraze are backed by verified information from peer-reviewed and academic research papers, reputed organizations, research institutions, and medical associations to ensure accuracy and relevance. Read our editorial policy to learn more.

  1. Prevalence of olfactory impairment in older adults. JAMA, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12425708
  2. Taste Perception of Sweet, Sour, Salty, Bitter, and Umami and Changes Due to l-Arginine Supplementation, as a Function of Genetic Ability to Taste 6-n-Propylthiouracil, MDPI, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5490520/
  3. Smell and taste disorders. GMS Current Topics in Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22558054
  4. Smell and taste disorders: a primary care approach. American Family Physician, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10670508
  5. Zinc and the special senses. Annals of Internal Medicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6349457
  6. Effect of ricinoleic acid in acute and subchronic experimental models of inflammation. US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/11200362/
  7. Immunomodulation and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Garlic Compounds, Journal of Immunology Research, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4417560/
  8. Active Compounds in Gingers and Their Therapeutic Use in Complementary Medicine, Medicinal and Aromatic Plant Science and Biotechnology, Semantic Scholar.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3665023/https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Active-Compounds-in-Gingers-and-Their-Therapeutic-Qin-Xu/e3308daa7c3c6aa0e90aeeac21116da90afcaf96?p2df
  9. Capsaicin for non-allergic rhinitis. US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/26171907/
  10. The Effect of Capsaicin on Salivary Gland Dysfunction. US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27347918/
  11. Cytological Aspects on the Effects of a Nasal Spray Consisting of Standardized Extract of Citrus Lemon and Essential Oils in Allergic Rhinopathy, ISRN Pharmaceutics, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3523552/
  12. Vinegar: Medicinal Uses and Antiglycemic Effect, Medscape General Medicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1785201/
  13. Anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory effects of synthetic acetic acid vinegar and Nipa vinegar on high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, Scientific Reports, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5532206/
  14. Oil pulling for maintaining oral hygiene – A review, Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5198813/
  15. Trachyspermum ammi, Pharmacognosy Review, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3358968/
  16. Cinnamon: A Multifaceted Medicinal Plant, Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4003790/
  17. A review of the bioactivity and potential health benefits of peppermint tea (Mentha piperita L.). US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/16767798/
  18. The anti-inflammatory activity of L-menthol compared to mint oil in human monocytes in vitro: a novel perspective for its therapeutic use in inflammatory diseases. US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/9889172/
  19. Evaluation of Bioactive Compounds, Pharmaceutical Quality, and Anticancer Activity of Curry Leaf (Murraya koenigii L.), Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3947808/
  20. Anti-inflammatory activity of 1.8-cineol (eucalyptol) in bronchial asthma: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/12645832/, National Institutes of Health.
  21. Comparison of the Healing Effect of Nasal Saline Irrigation with Triamcinolone Acetonide Versus Nasal Saline Irrigation alone in COVID-19 Related Olfactory Dysfunction: A Randomized Controlled Study
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8272442/
  22. A possible correlation between vitamin D deficiency and loss of smell: 2 case reports, The Journal of Chiropractic Medicine, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3315864/
  23. Nutrition and taste and smell dysfunction, GMS Current Topics in Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6051307/
  24. The role of zinc in the treatment of taste disorders. Recent Patents on Food, Nutrition & Agriculture, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23305423
  25. Loss of smell linked to Alzheimer’s cognitive impairment and biomarkers. National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.nia.nih.gov/news/loss-smell-linked-alzheimers-cognitive-impairment-and-biomarkers
  26. [Olfactory perception in women with physiologically altered hormonal status (during pregnancy and menopause]. Medicinski Pregled, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12584889/
  27. A longitudinal study of altered taste and smell perception and change in blood pressure. Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases, US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6428580/
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