25 Belly Fat Burning Foods To Eat For A Slim Waist

Lose some inches at the waist by loading up on fruits, pulses, fish, and greens.

Medically Reviewed by Kate TurnerKate Turner, RD, CSSD, CPT
By Charushila BiswasCharushila Biswas, MSc (Biotechnology), ISSA Certified Fitness Nutritionist  • 

Belly fat can be threatening to your health (1). This fat is linked with insulin resistance, heart disease, and diabetes (2) (3) and can be dangerous for people of any genetics and age. Understanding the severity of the situation, today, we introduce you to some belly fat-burning foods in this article. You will surely lead a healthy life with these foods in your diet. Scroll down for more info!

25 Best Foods That Burn Belly Fat Fast

1. Fruits

Fruits are rich in vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber, and antioxidants (4).  Dietary fiber improves digestion, increases the number and variety of good gut microbes, improves metabolism, and helps lower blood pressure (5).

Citrus fruits like orange, lemon, kiwi, tangerine, and fresh limes are good sources of antioxidants and have antimicrobial properties (6), (7).

Other fat-burning fruits include apples, watermelons, grapes, and strawberries (8), (9), (10). However, make sure not to overdo it with fruits. Even though they contain lots of vitamins and minerals, they also contain sugar.

2. Pulses

Pulses help burn belly fat

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Pulses (or dal ) are protein-rich and low in calories and fat. The lean protein present in pulses helps build lean muscle mass, speeds up metabolism, and improves overall body function (11). Simply boiled dal is healthier than fried or spiced up dal.

3. Fish

Fish are great sources of protein and omega-3 fatty acids (12). Proteins help build muscle, and omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation in the body and increase metabolic rate (13), (14). Also, the lower the inflammation, the lower the chances of gaining weight that is triggered by stress and inflammation.

4. Almonds

Almonds keep your stomach full for a long time due to their healthy fat and protein content. They are good sources of nutrients for vegetarians to burn fat. They are also rich in omega-3 fatty acids that increase energy and metabolism (15).

5. Beans And Legumes

Beans and legumes are good sources of protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Consuming them regularly can help suppress hunger pangs, thereby preventing overeating. They are also great sources of protein for vegans and vegetarians. Try to mix three different legumes to provide your body with different micronutrients (16), (17).

6. Spinach And Other Green Vegetables

Spinach and other green vegetables as foods that burn belly fat

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Vegetables like spinach, kale, collard greens, radish greens, carrot, broccoli, and turnip are rich in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and dietary fiber (18), (19). These vegetables can help reduce belly fat by increasing satiety, reducing inflammation, and aiding digestion (20), (21).

7. Dairy Products

Full-fat dairy products are recommended as they are loaded with nutrients and can keep you satiated for a long duration, thereby aiding weight loss (22). Slim or skimmed milk is devoid of these nutrients and does not keep your hunger pangs at bay as effectively as full-fat dairy products.

8. Oatmeal

Oats are rich in fiber and aid digestion. They contain insoluble fiber and carbohydrates that curb your hunger and give you energy for your workout (23). Eat oatmeal in the morning with some nut butter or nuts for added protein. When buying oatmeal, make sure that you choose one that is flavorless as flavored oats contain sugar and chemicals.

9. Peanut Butter

Peanut butter as one of the foods that burn belly fat

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Peanut butter is a great option to sweeten your breakfast or smoothies. The nut butter is loaded with protein, vitamin E, iron, potassium, zinc,  antioxidants, dietary fiber, and polyphenolsi  X A class of naturally occurring organic compounds found in fruits and vegetables with disease-fighting properties. (24). Consume a handful of soaked or boiled peanuts as a snack to curb hunger pangs. Do not go overboard and consume too many peanuts as they are calorie-dense.

10. Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Cooking with extra virgin olive oil is good for weight loss and general health because it helps lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and increases the levels of HDL (good) cholesterol (25). It is a weight loss-friendly and heart-friendly oil that you can use to cook or season your food.

11. Whole Grains

Whole grains, such as millet, quinoa, and brown rice, are good sources of protein, vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber (26). Consuming them can keep your hunger pangs at bay, aid digestion, and prevent constipation (27), (28), (29). This, in turn, can help you shed the belly fat easily.

12. Protein Powder

Protein powders are a great option if you cannot load up on whole foods that are rich in protein. You can take whey protein, vegan protein powder, or homemade protein powder to help improve muscle mass and increase your metabolism (30).

13. Chia Seeds

It has become a trend now to include chia seeds in smoothies, salads, and breakfast bowls. They are a great source of protein and healthy fats, and two tablespoons of chia seeds contain almost 10 grams of dietary fiber (31). Chia seeds are gluten-free, increase satiety, and have anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antioxidant, and laxative properties (32).

14. Mushrooms

Mushrooms as one of the foods that burn belly fat

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According to Kayleen St.John, R.D., Executive Director of Nutrition and Strategic Development of Euphebe, low levels of vitamin D are connected to abdominal obesity (33). Mushrooms are good sources of vitamin D (34). They are low in calories, high in protein and water content, and extremely delicious (35).  You can easily prepare mushroom soup or add them to salads and sandwiches to make a delicious lunch or dinner without worrying about calories.

15. Raspberries

Raspberries are loaded with dietary fiber and polyphenols like anthocyanins and ellagitannins (36). The dietary fiber helps add bulk to the stool, improves bowel movement, and keeps you satiated for a long time (37), (38). The antioxidants in them help scavenge the harmful free oxygen radicals, thereby reducing inflammation and inflammation-induced obesity (39), (40). Consume raspberries in breakfast bowls or smoothies.

16. Coconut Oil

Virgin coconut oil increases good cholesterol (HDL cholesterol) levels (41). Use edible-grade coconut oil for cooking. You can also have bullet coffee as your morning drink to keep you charged the entire day.

Note: Talk to your physician before consuming coconut oil regularly.

17. Soup

According to Julieanna Hever, author of The Vegiterranean Diet, having soup before meals helps reduce the number of calories you consume. This, in turn, can help prevent fat accumulation in the belly region (42). You need to consume vegetables, chicken, or mushroom clear soup. Ideally, make soups at home to reap the maximum benefits.

18. Eggs

A study published in the International Journal of Obesity compared weight loss after an egg breakfast to that after a bagel breakfast containing similar calories. Participants who consumed two eggs for breakfast lost 65% more weight, and their waist circumference reduced by a whopping 34% (43). This is because eggs are a great source of protein and both water- and fat-soluble vitamins that help keep the hunger pangs at bay and build lean muscle.

19. Spicy Chili Peppers

Chili peppers like cayenne, green chili, and red chili are loaded with vitamin C and capsaicini  XAn active component in chili peppers responsible for their pungent flavor and burning sensation. that help increase the metabolic rate and insulin sensitivity and help burn fat (44). Add cayenne pepper or red chili flakes to your salads, and green chilis to fritters or omelet. They not only enhance the taste but can also help you lose weight.

20. Broccoli

From reducing obesity to reducing the risk of breast cancer, broccoli offers a wide range of benefits (45), (46). In fact, experts believe that consuming broccoli may improve insulin resistance in people with type 2 diabetes (47). The phytonutrientsi  XNatural chemical compounds produced by plants with anti-cancer, cardioprotective, and disease-preventing properties. present in broccoli have the potential to flush out toxins, reduce inflammation, reduce the risk of cancer, and boost overall health (48). Consume blanched or grilled broccoli with salads and soups to reduce weight.

21. Nuts

Nuts like walnuts, macadamia nuts, pine nuts, and pistachios are good for weight loss. They are loaded with healthy fats and protein that increase your satiety levels, improve the taste of food, and prevent you from snacking on other trans fat-loaded junk food. Regular consumption of nuts helps prevent obesity and the risk of type 2 diabetes (49).

22. Farro

Farro or emmer is a wheat product that is dried and sold. It can be consumed after cooking in water and adding to soups and salads. It is high in dietary fiber, iron, and calcium, and low in sodium (50). Dietary fiber keeps you satiated for a long duration and cleanses the colon by improving bowel movement and preventing constipation(5). Consume farro for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, and you will notice the difference in your hunger cycle immediately.

23. Yogurt

Yogurt is loaded with good gut bacteria that aid digestion and take care of your gut health (51). In a study published in the British Journal of Nutrition, scientists found that women who consumed probiotics lost twice as much weight compared to those who did not (52). Include yogurt in your diet by using it to make smoothies and salad dressing.

24. Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut as one of the foods that burn belly fat

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Sauerkraut is a fermented food. Kimchi (pickled vegetables) is a good source of probiotics or good gut bacteria that help reduce bloating and improve digestion. According to Frank Lipman, M.D., founder of Eleven Eleven Wellness Center in New York City, including sauerkraut in your diet can help protect your gut from being overtaken by pathogenic bacteria that cause health problems (53). Hence, have some lip-smacking kimchi or sauerkraut to lose weight.

25. Spirulina

Spirulina is a low-calorie, protein-rich, anti-inflammatory, immuno-stimulating, blood lipid-lowering, and blood pressure-lowering single-cell protein (54). Include it in your diet after consulting your doctor. You can add it to salads, smoothies, and juices.

These are the 25 belly fat-burning foods you may include in your diet. But have you ever wondered why fat accumulates in your belly? Here’s why.

[ Read: Top 15 Drinks That Help You Lose Weight]

Did You Know?
Your belly comprises two types of fat: subcutaneous fat (underneath the skin) and visceral fat (surrounds your vital organs).

Why Does Fat Accumulate Around Your Belly?

  • Hormonal Changes

Hormones play a major role in determining fat distribution in the body. Hormonal imbalance can lead to increased hunger, slow metabolism, and increased stress levels, leading to belly fat accumulation (55).

  • Genes

If obesity runs in your genes, you may be more prone to accumulating fat in your belly region (56).

  • Stress

Stress can increase your risk of accumulating belly fat through increased cortisoli  XA primary hormone that regulates the body’s stress response and affects every organ and tissue. levels or increasing your food consumption (57).

  • Lack Of Sleep

Sleep deprivation increases the production of stress hormones in the body, which can lead to overall weight gain (58).

  • Sugary Foods And Beverages

Sugary foods and beverages are devils in disguise. They contain high amounts of additives, preservatives, and artificial colors, which are major contributors to belly fat (59).

  • Alcohol

Alcohol is broken down into sugar in the body, and the excess sugar gets converted to fat. Excess sugar from alcohol can also lead to inflammation and inflammation-induced abdominal obesity (60).

  • Trans Fats

Trans fats are unhealthy fats found in processed and fried foods. They tend to accumulate fat in the belly region and slow down fat metabolism (61).

  • Inactivity

Being inactive can also lead to the accumulation of belly fat (62). A sedentary lifestyle is a primary reason for the increase in the incidence of obesity worldwide. Desk jobs, sitcoms, and lethargy are pushing people more and more toward obesity and obesity-related diseases.

  • Low-Protein Diets

Being on a low-protein diet can also be harmful when it comes to losing belly fat. Lack of protein in your diet can lead to high stress and inflammation, increased toxicity, and slow metabolism (63).

  • Menopause

Women who are going through menopause experience hormonal changes. High levels of cortisol (or the stress hormone) can be responsible for women gaining belly fat during this period (64).

  • Low-Fiber Diets

Low-fiber diets can lead to weight gain, especially in the belly region (65). Low-fiber foods include white rice, flour, and peeled fruits. Dietary fiber helps increase satiety and aids stool movement in the colon, preventing the accumulation of belly fat (5).

But do not let these reasons deter you from shedding this dangerous type of fat. Here are some other things you can do to lose belly fat.

StyleCraze Says
Do not opt for fad diets in desperation. Eat healthy, balanced meals, exercise regularly, and destress to lose weight.

Other Things To Do To Lose Belly Fat

  • Avoid packaged fruit juices, soda, and energy drinks.
  • Have protein in every meal and snack.
  • Reduce carbs in your diet.
  • Consume foods rich in fiber, especially viscous fiber.
  • Exercise is very effective in reducing belly fat. Hence, you should exercise regularly.
  • Track your meals and figure out what and how much you are eating.

Infographic: Top Foods To Have To Lose Weight Naturally

Shedding those stubborn pounds is now within your reach. A good workout program and the right mix of healthy, nourishing foods are all you need to achieve your fitness goals. These comprise a range of fruits, veggies, and nuts you may find in your kitchen. Check out the infographic below to learn more about the foods you need to include in your diet to aid your weight loss efforts.

top food for weight lose naturally[infographic]

Illustration: StyleCraze Design Team

Stubborn belly fat may pose a risk to your overall health. It may result from hormonal imbalance, stress, genes, inactivity, menopause, alcohol, and lack of sleep. However, incorporating belly fat-burning foods into your diet may help reduce belly fat. These include fruits, pulses, fish, beans, almonds, green leafy vegetables, peanut butter, oatmeal, protein powder, whole grains, eggs, broccoli, and nuts. In addition, avoiding packaged fruit juices and regularly exercising can help manage belly fat effectively.

Frequently Asked Questions

What can I drink at night to lose belly fat?

Drinks like aloe vera juice or green tea are safe to consume during bedtime. Aloe vera juice contains antioxidant properties while green tea is a rich source of flavonoids which may help reduce belly fat (65), (66),(67), (68).

Does hot water with lemon reduce belly fat?

Yes, lemon is a rich source of antioxidants that aid in improving metabolism. This may suppress body fat accumulation and prevent obesity (69).

How can I use cinnamon to lose belly fat?

You can consume cinnamon in the form of tea. Boil a stick of it and add 1 teaspoon of honey and a few drops of lemon juice (optional) to enhance its effect.

Sources

Articles on StyleCraze are backed by verified information from peer-reviewed and academic research papers, reputed organizations, research institutions, and medical associations to ensure accuracy and relevance. Read our editorial policy to learn more.

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